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Discussion Starter #1
Just finished redoing my carbs, and tonight I plan on installing them. Any advice on the easiest way to get them on? Should I put the rubber tubes on the carbs then wiggle them on the motor or should this be done the other way around? Another thing is how can you tell which is the idle cable and which is the throttle cable? Does it make a difference?
 

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Don't have access to manual here, but one boot goes on the carb and the other goes on the head. They must be clocked a certain way so that the pitch/angle is correct (also in manual).

Use plenty of WD40 to lube up the areas you are trying to mesh togehter, it helps.

One is the open and the other is the close cable. Turn the throttle while watching the cables and you will know which is which.

Jon
 

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Do you still have the stock air box/system?

When I did mine recently, I had a hard time getting my gorilla mitts in the tight space with that box in the way. Lance328 has some good tips for getting the box up as much as possible but it's a fight with that box in there. If you pulled the air box and did the ear shave, that opens up the cavity a little better.

I slid mine in from the left side. It takes some finesse getting the carb in place, but truly you'll just have to fiddle with it until it goes in. Then, mounting the carbs on the boots was easy with a little wd40 on the inside of each boot.

It took me about 20 minutes to do this the first time then I had to pull it immediately and I cut the second attempt in half.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yea I did the ear shave and air box was removed. Sounds like its going to be an adventure.. :)
 

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The Professor
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Yea I did the ear shave and air box was removed. Sounds like its going to be an adventure.. :)
No problem. Keep both boots on the cylinders and make sure the boots are lined up correctly to the cylinder. Install the push and pull throttle cables but do not mount them in their holders until carbs are in. Spray some WD_40 on the boots an pop in the carbs from the right side.
 

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WD is a good idea on the rubber boots and so is a warm room or use a heat lamp on the rubber parts before you try to assemble.

DT
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Ok well I was able to get the carbs in last night, I am having a major issue with connecting the choke and adjusting the open/close cables. I believe I have them in the respective holders but the pull cable is not pulling the throttle closed. Any insight on what I may be doing wrong.

**It seems that the choke spring and holder are in the wrong place. I will now have to take the carbs off and see if I can swap them. So one issue down just on to the throttle cables. That is whats giving me the most trouble.
 

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Without the airbox it will be easy. I just removed mine, and put them back WITH the airbox, and it was no fun at all. I had already removed the CA evap system and the air injection system, so those were out of the way. I removed both "ducts" that go between the carbs and airbox first, and put them back last. With lots of WD40, it's not that hard, they are so squishable you can just wad them up to get them into place. You need a Maglite, or some other small but bright flashlight to make sure they are properly seated in the airbox. DO NOT use a screwdriver. I poked a hole in one of the ducts that way once. But you don't have to worry about putting those back on. But you may have to remove and reinstall the carbs again. I removed mine with the throttle cables still attached, and put them back that way. It is virtually impossible to install the throttle cables with the carbs installed. The choke cable is not that difficult.


IMO, this is one of the worst designed setups I've ever seen, even removing/reinstalling the carbs on a Suzuki Intruder 800 is easy by comparison. But with plenty of time and patience, the right "feel", and doing everything in the proper order, it is not as bad as it first looks. I have fairly large hands, but after having been a mechanic all my life, I am good at manipulating parts in tight spaces. If you are "fighting" with it, give it up, go do something else, change your attitude, and come back. They do fit, it's just that everything has to be in exactly the right position, as there is no room left over anywhere. Jerry.
 

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The Professor
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Without the airbox it will be easy. I just removed mine, and put them back WITH the airbox, and it was no fun at all. I had already removed the CA evap system and the air injection system, so those were out of the way. I removed both "ducts" that go between the carbs and airbox first, and put them back last. With lots of WD40, it's not that hard, they are so squishable you can just wad them up to get them into place. You need a Maglite, or some other small but bright flashlight to make sure they are properly seated in the airbox. DO NOT use a screwdriver. I poked a hole in one of the ducts that way once. But you don't have to worry about putting those back on. But you may have to remove and reinstall the carbs again. I removed mine with the throttle cables still attached, and put them back that way. It is virtually impossible to install the throttle cables with the carbs installed. The choke cable is not that difficult.


IMO, this is one of the worst designed setups I've ever seen, even removing/reinstalling the carbs on a Suzuki Intruder 800 is easy by comparison. But with plenty of time and patience, the right "feel", and doing everything in the proper order, it is not as bad as it first looks. I have fairly large hands, but after having been a mechanic all my life, I am good at manipulating parts in tight spaces. If you are "fighting" with it, give it up, go do something else, change your attitude, and come back. They do fit, it's just that everything has to be in exactly the right position, as there is no room left over anywhere. Jerry.
You will get no arguement here! As many times I have R&I the carbs on these bikes with the surge tank I still dread having to do it. With the surge tank removed I can install in 30-45 seconds with both boots on the heads. With the surge tank it still takes me about 10 minutes. :hitanykey

How is the bike running with the new jets?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm still having issue's with the throttle cables, I can't figure out why it doesn't close correctly. And even though I have the choke on correctly that doesn't seem to work correctly either. I think I am going to take it to a near by shop and have them dyno tune it as well as adjust all the cables.
 

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The Professor
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lube the cables, if they still stick then it may be time for new cables. The metal lining gets grooves where the cable slides and once you move the cable from the original position sometimes the cable will stick. Not so much a problem on newer models but 12-15 years or older it's best to replace the cables.
 

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Don't have access to manual here, but one boot goes on the carb and the other goes on the head. They must be clocked a certain way so that the pitch/angle is correct (also in manual).

Use plenty of WD40 to lube up the areas you are trying to mesh togehter, it helps.

One is the open and the other is the close cable. Turn the throttle while watching the cables and you will know which is which.

Jon
Boy I wish I could get you guys to knock off the WD-40 advertisements. WD-40 is a penetrant, not a lubricant. It also plays hell on rubber and aluminum when left in mating surfaces like bolts. Your manifold boots lose about a years worth of service time with every application.

I'm a pilot, and I take maintenance issues seriously. Ditch the WD-40. My '88 VN750 has 93,874 miles on it, and never a drop of WD-40 and never any service done in a dealer's shop. And she's as pretty and tight as the day she left the showroom.
 

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I have used so much of it that I feel like part owner of the wd-40 company. lol And I am going to keep on using it. Did I say that already? lol
 

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The Professor
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Boy I wish I could get you guys to knock off the WD-40 advertisements. WD-40 is a penetrant, not a lubricant. It also plays hell on rubber and aluminum when left in mating surfaces like bolts. Your manifold boots lose about a years worth of service time with every application.

I'm a pilot, and I take maintenance issues seriously. Ditch the WD-40. My '88 VN750 has 93,874 miles on it, and never a drop of WD-40 and never any service done in a dealer's shop. And she's as pretty and tight as the day she left the showroom.
You may want to check your facts before you make a post, WD-40 is also a lubricant and does not harm rubber or aluminum.

Direct from WD- Website

What does WD-40 do?
WD-40 fulfills five basic functions:
1. CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, grime and grease to clean. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape and excess bonding material.
2. DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits.
3. PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts.
4. LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and tenaciously held to all moving parts.
5. PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements.


What surfaces or materials are OK to use WD-40 on?
WD-40 can be used on just about everything. It is safe for metal, rubber, wood and plastic. WD-40 can be applied to painted metal surfaces without harming the paint. Polycarbonate and clear polystyrene plastic are among the few surfaces on which to avoid using a petroleum-based product like WD-40.
 

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Wd40 is also a top secret fish attractant. It's illegal but i HEARD you soak your lures in it and bass love it.
Really? By happy coincedence my Son in Law is going to introduce me to the delights of specimine Carp fishing in a couple of weeks. I shall have to see if it works as well on freshwater fish as you claim it does on salt water ones.
 

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Largemouth and smallmouth bass are freshwater fish in North America.
 

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I'm still having issue's with the throttle cables, I can't figure out why it doesn't close correctly. And even though I have the choke on correctly that doesn't seem to work correctly either. I think I am going to take it to a near by shop and have them dyno tune it as well as adjust all the cables.
Can you shoot a couple of pics of how you've got the choke assembled? If you've done the shave, you can usually get the choke cable in the holder without too much trouble; so I'm thinking the linkage bar may be installed incorrectly. Also, if you move the throttle plate on the carb by hand (i.e. not using the throttle sleeve on the bars), do the plates open and snap shut freely?
 

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Boy I wish I could get you guys to knock off the WD-40 advertisements. WD-40 is a penetrant, not a lubricant. It also plays hell on rubber and aluminum when left in mating surfaces like bolts. Your manifold boots lose about a years worth of service time with every application.

I'm a pilot, and I take maintenance issues seriously. Ditch the WD-40. My '88 VN750 has 93,874 miles on it, and never a drop of WD-40 and never any service done in a dealer's shop. And she's as pretty and tight as the day she left the showroom.


I was also a licensed private pilot from 1983-1985, and still fly occasionally, with a rented plane and CFI. I am also a professional auto mechanic, and have been for 32 years. I use WD40 on a daily basis. WD40 WILL NOT harm ANY kind of metal, it will damage certain plastics and rubber parts, depending on exactly what they are made out of. I don't recommend using it on tire beads as a mounting lubricant, other than in an emergency, but I have used it all my life to clean grease and chain lube off rear tires with no problem. I see no issue with using it on carb boots, though I myself used STP Son of a Gun. Windex will also work, as long as you keep everything soaked in it while you are installing the carbs. It also evaporates fast, and doesn't leave a mess to clean up when it does. Jerry.


Anyone wanting to know more about WD40, check the Wikipedia article here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

I have used WD40 since about age 3, and have used countless gallons of it since then, I have even taken a bath in the stuff a few times, it is non toxic, and is safe around food handling facilities. I would not suggest drinking it, it is a petroleum distillate, But it's molecules are far to large to penetrate skin, so it poses no danger just from getting it on your hands, other than like any other petroleum distillate, it can temporarily remove the oils from your skin. I even use it as a conditioner for my leather work boots. Jerry.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Right now the bike is in the shop to get tuned after the ear shave. Should get it back sometime today.
 
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