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Discussion Starter #1
I am suspecting the low speed jet on one carb may be blocked - unable to raise little throttle on on a warm engine. It Idles ok and I can raise the throttle way up as well - but wont hold if i raise it to 1500 rpm.

I do see a lot of SEAFOAM articles - would that be the way to possibly clear the low speed jet or is there something else ?

Thanks
 

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That would be the first step I'd take. Much easier to open the gas tank and pour some in than trying to get the carbs off. I'd fill the tank (with gas), put in about 5-6 ounces of SeaFoam and go for a nice ride.

Hopefully, it will loosen up whatever was causing the problem. If not, at least you got to take a nice ride before you had to work on it.
 

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The Professor
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I am suspecting the low speed jet on one carb may be blocked - unable to raise little throttle on on a warm engine. It Idles ok and I can raise the throttle way up as well - but wont hold if i raise it to 1500 rpm.

I do see a lot of SEAFOAM articles - would that be the way to possibly clear the low speed jet or is there something else ?

Thanks
Seaoam video that dirttrack650 had posted. :smiley_th

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6187290865726229173&hl=en
 

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Calif Rider
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Did you do a good draining of the the fuel tank and the Carbs. I really think that a good draining of the carbs is needed more often if you ride alot. I plan to drain mine about every 6 months. Last time I drained them there was evidance of a few particles in the gas that was drained into a white rag.
 

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CWO3 Navy (Retired)
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I run Seafoam in every tankful. Haven't had a problem since doing this. Is the engine stumbling at all? Might want to check the air hose in the air filter housing to see if it's hitting the side of the housing and not letting air in. Happened to me and I secured it so it won't happen again, hasn't stumbled since. Just a thought.
 

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Premium Member
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You might want to check fuel line routing.: i had that problem and found a pinched (to tight a bend) fuel line! Good luck!! :doh:
 

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Vintage bike addict
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best of luck to you. While you ride chop the throttle once in a while to get max vacuum to the carbs and draw fuel threough the low speed jets. This may just fix the problem. I've done it with good result a few times on my bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Chop the throttle - you mean a sudden throttle open and close ?
Ok i checked all the lines - seemed fine
I placed a tissue below the drain and drained the carb end - Tissue did not show any loose grains or deposits - assuming there is no loose dust or rust
Just poured some seafoam in - its too cold to ride!! Took a small ride inside the streets and came back - will wait for the weather god to be more considerate

Thanks again all
R
 

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Vintage bike addict
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I mean run at higher RPM and suddenly close the throttle. Let the motorcycle coast down in gear a few seconds at a time. Then repeat. Don't allow this activity to endanger your ride. No one should be following when you do this.The idea is to force fuel through the idle jets with the extra vacuum caused when the motor is forced to run with a closed throttle by sheer momentum of the bike. That was my theory when I tried it on my Virago and it did work. I'm still not certain if my theory was correct or why it worked but I was sure happy to avoid removing the carbs.
 

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You probably did exactly the right thing by introducing seafoam, then riding a short bit and parking the bike. Your seafoam mix is getting the chance to soak in the carbs and hopefully will clean it and dissolve varnish and crud while it sits. Yes, there is a lot of talk about seafoam on this site and many others and I would say we all feel like it is a miracle juice in a can. I don't remember if I copied the article and posted it here or not, but one guy bought an old "treasure" bike at least 20+ years old, had old stale gas in the tank and carbs were varnished to the max. Someone had told him about using seafoam. He drained the carbs and tank, filled it with fresh gas, added a bunch of seafoam, also filled the carbs and let it sit for a couple days. He put a new battery on the bike and gave it a crank and it started, but ran like crap, so he let it sit a few more days and eventually it ran great, just using seafoam. Seems like it had set for about 6 or 7 years with the old gas in it. Anyway, he was pleased as a peach that he didn't have to pull and rebuild/clean the carbs.
I had a similar experience with my KZ1000. I had it apart, doing a valve shim job, had my shims ordered and was waiting for all the parts, and a new head gasket. It sat on my carport, more or less out of the weather, but it rained on and off the entire time I had it apart. When I put it back together, it ran sluggish and idle was really rough. I put in a good amount of seafoam in the gas and took it for a ride. During the ride, I could feel the bike being "healed" and by the time I got home, it was running fine. So, this is why we call it a miracle in a can.
 

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The Professor
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After running seafoam in the fuel for awhile and the problem still exists you can remove the fuel lines, drain the carbs and fill with seafoam and let set for a day or two. Install the fuel lines and start, you do not have to drain the seafoam. If you don't want to remove the fuel lines you can drain carbs an pour the seafoam into the carb vent hose. If these attempts fail the carbs will have to be removed and cleaned. If you need help I am about 6 miles away. :smiley_th
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Lance - Thanks for your offer - really appreciate it - So the weather god heard me last night I guess - I took her out for a spin and came back - Guess what - This product needs to be called DreamFoam! . I dont see the problem anymore - At first I thot this cant be true - So i shut the engine and started it up after about 15 mins - and tried to rev a wee bit and she was just roaring gently . Thanks folks and also watching the Seafoam video on Youtube gave me a little bit of guts to go do it. I had used a similar product on my Altima before and had the Check Engine light up - it cost me more $$$ to fix it .

Seafoam yes its a Dreamfoam
 

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The Professor
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Lance - Thanks for your offer - really appreciate it - So the weather god heard me last night I guess - I took her out for a spin and came back - Guess what - This product needs to be called DreamFoam! . I dont see the problem anymore - At first I thot this cant be true - So i shut the engine and started it up after about 15 mins - and tried to rev a wee bit and she was just roaring gently . Thanks folks and also watching the Seafoam video on Youtube gave me a little bit of guts to go do it. I had used a similar product on my Altima before and had the Check Engine light up - it cost me more $$$ to fix it .

Seafoam yes its a Dreamfoam
Glad to hear seafoam did the trick, it can definately work miracles. :beerchug:
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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I run Seafoam in every tankful. Haven't had a problem since doing this. Is the engine stumbling at all? Might want to check the air hose in the air filter housing to see if it's hitting the side of the housing and not letting air in. Happened to me and I secured it so it won't happen again, hasn't stumbled since. Just a thought.
If that is the vent hose in the right side ear (air filter box), others have suggested cutting the end off at a 45* angle to prevent it being blocked off by pushing into the box too far.
 

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I mean run at higher RPM and suddenly close the throttle. Let the motorcycle coast down in gear a few seconds at a time. Then repeat. Don't allow this activity to endanger your ride. No one should be following when you do this.The idea is to force fuel through the idle jets with the extra vacuum caused when the motor is forced to run with a closed throttle by sheer momentum of the bike. That was my theory when I tried it on my Virago and it did work. I'm still not certain if my theory was correct or why it worked but I was sure happy to avoid removing the carbs.
Excellent idea!:beerchug:
 
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