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Discussion Starter #1
ok. I just have a question. Why on earth would someone think of putting a CAR tire on a motorcycle!? what benefit does that do!? Isnt there a reason why there are payed engineers who design these motorcycle tires? Why would anyone want to put a car tire on a motorcycle. opinons on this?
 

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Daily rider
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Don't knock it until you've tried it. There are lots of reasons, but go out and do the research before poo-pooing it. I switched, and will never go back.
 

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You would think a car tire would be a really bad idea, especially in corners, but it has been proven to work. Main reason to use one is better mileage. I would think that with the harder rubber compound of a car tire, the rear brake wouldn't work as well, but even if it doesn't, the rear brake is not that big of a deal. If you are using the brakes right (on the street) then almost all the braking is done by the front brakes. You have to be really easy with the rear brake to avoid locking it up when all the weight transfers to the front.
 

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Captive New Yorker....
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Wow, had no idea car tires would be an option. Motorcycle tires are insanely expensive, and you get what, 10K miles out of them???? What size car tires fits on our Vulcan?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don't knock it until you've tried it. There are lots of reasons, but go out and do the research before poo-pooing it. I switched, and will never go back.
I'm no poo pooing anything haha. I'm simply asking for opinions
Because I'm ignorant on this subject.
 

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Has anyone done this with the vn750 and if so what is the tire size that you run.
Also is this a rear tire mod only or could it be done on the front.
 

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Has anyone done this with the vn750 and if so what is the tire size that you run.
Also is this a rear tire mod only or could it be done on the front.
It's a rear tire thing.. If I remember right it's a 165/60 on the 750.. I was thinking about trying it myself if the bike lives long enough to see another rear tire..
 

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For some reason I'm getting almost twice the mileage out of my ME880 rear tires as most everybody else (I think it is the pressure I use) If going to a car tire would double that, I'd probably do it. A LOT of Goldwing riders use car tires without any problems. But a Goldwing is heavy, and eats tires. Not sure it would be worthwhile on the Vulcan since I get 20,000 miles out of a rear tire. There is also the issue of how to plug a steel belted radial beside the road, whether you could mount it yourself, or would have to have a shop do it. Many motorcycle shops would probably not do it, and car tire places are not set up to mount tires on motorcycle wheels.
 

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Linkmeister Supreme
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Here is a write-up of one rider who has over 100k miles experience of riding his 2001 F6 Valkyrie on a car tire. He will answer a lot of questions about why he did it. It is long, but quite informative IMHO:
http://lifeisaroad.com/stories/2004/10/27/theDarkSide.html

The link slim gave to crznurs taking her vn700 to the darkside convinces me that it can be done to a midsized cruiser.
 

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IMO, it all depends on what your going to use your bike for most. Wider tires are much better for touring and long highway trips, whereas narrower tires with a higher profile are generally better for the twisties at high speeds.
And with ANY size tire, it's all in the footprint it has at different inflations. A smaller footprint will yield better gas milage due to less drag, but will sacrifice traction. A wider footprint will give better stability, but will increase drag somewhat (if at proper inflation).
And as for inflation, I never looked at the "manufacturers recommended"....thats an average thats given, and is just a starting point. I always ask someone close to my weight to sit on the bike, then get my face down to the macadam to view the actual footprint. I personally prefer wider tires (although not extremes like some of the new choppers), but all I generally do is putt around.
 

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For some reason I'm getting almost twice the mileage out of my ME880 rear tires as most everybody else (I think it is the pressure I use) If going to a car tire would double that, I'd probably do it. A LOT of Goldwing riders use car tires without any problems. But a Goldwing is heavy, and eats tires. Not sure it would be worthwhile on the Vulcan since I get 20,000 miles out of a rear tire. There is also the issue of how to plug a steel belted radial beside the road, whether you could mount it yourself, or would have to have a shop do it. Many motorcycle shops would probably not do it, and car tire places are not set up to mount tires on motorcycle wheels.
You can plug any tubeless tire while it is still mounted on the wheel, with the "Stop and Go" mushroon head plugs as seen here:
http://www.stopngo.com/products/TUBELESS-PUNCTURE-PILOT.html

On old styled tire machines the wheel is set down with the center hole over a threaded post and a threaded cone is spun down to hold the wheel in place while breaking the bead and removing the tire. This type of tire machine will not work on a MC wheel because the hole through the hub is too small.

I think tire shops that have machines that grip cast rims without marking them, may work on MC tires (edit: should read "rims"). I need to go take a closer look at a tire machine to be sure it will clear the brake rotors on the front or the hub on the rear.
 

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I think tire shops that have machines that grip cast rims without marking them, may work on MC tires. I need to go take a closer look at a tire machine to be sure it will clear the brake rotors on the front or the hub on the rear.
They work, Ft Rucker Auto Craft shop has one and I've change several tires over the past three years with no problems.
 

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Daily rider
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IMO, it all depends on what your going to use your bike for most. Wider tires are much better for touring and long highway trips, whereas narrower tires with a higher profile are generally better for the twisties at high speeds.
And with ANY size tire, it's all in the footprint it has at different inflations. A smaller footprint will yield better gas milage due to less drag, but will sacrifice traction. A wider footprint will give better stability, but will increase drag somewhat (if at proper inflation).
And as for inflation, I never looked at the "manufacturers recommended"....thats an average thats given, and is just a starting point. I always ask someone close to my weight to sit on the bike, then get my face down to the macadam to view the actual footprint. I personally prefer wider tires (although not extremes like some of the new choppers), but all I generally do is putt around.
Actually, my 1600 hugs the road better in the twisties with the CT than it did with the Metzlers or Bridgestones I previously had. I run a 205/60 16 on the rear of it.
 

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BFGoodrich Radial T/A 155/80-15 Tire
 

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IMO, it all depends on what your going to use your bike for most. Wider tires are much better for touring and long highway trips, whereas narrower tires with a higher profile are generally better for the twisties at high speeds.
And with ANY size tire, it's all in the footprint it has at different inflations. A smaller footprint will yield better gas milage due to less drag, but will sacrifice traction. A wider footprint will give better stability, but will increase drag somewhat (if at proper inflation).
And as for inflation, I never looked at the "manufacturers recommended"....thats an average thats given, and is just a starting point. I always ask someone close to my weight to sit on the bike, then get my face down to the macadam to view the actual footprint. I personally prefer wider tires (although not extremes like some of the new choppers), but all I generally do is putt around.
http://lifeisaroad.com/stories/2004/10/27/theDarkSide.html
Note a quote from Daniel Meyer link above, and how he measures the width of his tires contact patch. (It is more fun than laying down on the black top too Wolfie :) :

You're gonna die a flaming death. You can't drive on the sidewall!
Hmmm . . . you're right, I can't drive on the sidewall. I'll keep you posted on the flaming death thing. No matter how far I lean the Valkyrie, I am never on the sidewall of this tire. It has molded in markings and the "rubber tits" from the mold process on the sidewall, and they remain pristine, untouched condition despite some very aggressive turning. I also set the bike over on its crash-bar one day to see where it rode, and it is not on the sidewall. All remains on the tread, and there is plenty of it. The contact patch of the car tire flattens on the bottom (as it is designed to do) keeping more half the tread on the pavement, even in full out, peg-dragging turns. The contact patch for the car-tire exceeds the size of the contact patch on the the only MC tire I had measured on this bike (Avon). An easy and fun way to measure is to find a street where water is running down it, that is otherwise dry (somebody watering the pavement again, a common thing here in Texas--I think they want it to grow). Ride the bike through the water and then into immediate peg-dragging turns. Then go look at the tracks. You'll be surprised.
 

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Well, we aint got no sidewalks around here really, and nobody waters the ones we have for fear of ice, lol. I see what he's saying though, so, in theory you could do this yerself with a gallon jug and 5' of concrete (like my front walk)...but cool idea ! Kudos for the link. Never saw that.
Dunno, but mebbe in my post I may have conveyed that Im an opponent to car tires. Im not. One of my older Harleys (74cu in) had car tires both front and rear. Was a stripped dresser, so all fit nicely Wideglide with chopped and bobbed rear fender). And I DO like the Avons for front, but prefer Dunlops for rear.
Now, talking dirt/motocross/enduro...one would prefer a narrower tire as it digs down to more solid soil with traction. Ya aint diggin through asphault unless mebbe on that monster bike (forget the name)...
But either way, either a print (too cool !) or nose to the blacktop (back in my bar days was there oft anyway, lol)...and look for this :




PS....I now REALLY remembered where the term "bobber" came from....was a 50s-60' womens hairdo that flipped up a lil by the neck. ORIGINAL "bobbers" had an upturned lip on the rear fender after cutting shorter. We ALL were doing that in the 70's and early 80s to our Harleys... interesting how numerous bike designers grabbed it eventually for production models (mostly Harley/AMF).

And Im far from doing tires yet (unless I win the lottery and can get whitewalls)....but when I do, Im sure as heck going dark. ;)
 
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