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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, went to get air in my rear tire and valve broke clean off by the time I said “you gotta be kiddin me” it was flat. So my question is should I be able to get a replacement valve at any auto store? Or do the bike valves have any special specs I should know about? I’m going to try to use a C-clamp to break the bead of the tire and swap it out. It’s just that there’s a million valves online and I’m hesitant to order something. I don’t feel like getting the wrong thing and burning more time and wasting money. I just had the stator replaced which took 3 weeks and too much $$, the flat is just adding insult to injury.
Appreciate the help
 

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NewB to Vulcans
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Some folks have installed right angle valves to make inflation easier, hopefully they will chime in.

If your valve stem was that old and dry rotted how bad are the tires? I got a different bike with much better handling just by putting a new stock Dunlop in the back, old one was not bald but was OLD.
 

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Whew, thought you were talking about an intake valve.

Tried checking a parts site, but they don't list a size, and it was was $24 for one valve. As long as you get the right diameter, and a usable length, valves from the auto store would be fine.

There are also metal valves available, which 'clamp in' with threaded stems, and some of those are 90°.

You just dodged a bullet, imagine losing air that quick 55mph. I'd replace the front too.

These are for a 9.7mm rim hole diameter, I'm not what ours takes: https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/xtra-seal-5344/agriculture-hd-parts---accessories-19818/agricultural---construction-20126/tire-repair-20137/tire-valves---caps-25158/tire-valves---cores-19036/acc234843ca6/xtra-seal-tire-valve/17544d/4870967?q=tire+valve+stem&pos=15

7/16" - https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/xtra-seal-5344/agriculture-hd-parts---accessories-19818/agricultural---construction-20126/tire-repair-20137/tire-valves---caps-25158/tire-valves---cores-19036/acc234843ca6/xtra-seal-snap-in-tire-valve-fits-rim-hole-diameter-7-16-inch/1741450/4870840?q=tire+valve+stem&pos=9
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Some folks have installed right angle valves to make inflation easier, hopefully they will chime in.

If your valve stem was that old and dry rotted how bad are the tires? I got a different bike with much better handling just by putting a new stock Dunlop in the back, old one was not bald but was OLD.
Whew, thought you were talking about an intake valve.

Tried checking a parts site, but they don't list a size, and it was was $24 for one valve. As long as you get the right diameter, and a usable length, valves from the auto store would be fine.

There are also metal valves available, which 'clamp in' with threaded stems, and some of those are 90°.

You just dodged a bullet, imagine losing air that quick 55mph. I'd replace the front too.

These are for a 9.7mm rim hole diameter, I'm not what ours takes: https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/xtra-seal-5344/agriculture-hd-parts---accessories-19818/agricultural---construction-20126/tire-repair-20137/tire-valves---caps-25158/tire-valves---cores-19036/acc234843ca6/xtra-seal-tire-valve/17544d/4870967?q=tire+valve+stem&pos=15

7/16" - https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/b/xtra-seal-5344/agriculture-hd-parts---accessories-19818/agricultural---construction-20126/tire-repair-20137/tire-valves---caps-25158/tire-valves---cores-19036/acc234843ca6/xtra-seal-snap-in-tire-valve-fits-rim-hole-diameter-7-16-inch/1741450/4870840?q=tire+valve+stem&pos=9
Thanks guys,

The tires are new Dunlop’s (installed last fall) didn’t change the stems so “duh” on my part there. I found metal valves with rubber seals at Pep Boys this morning for $7 and I also got a right angle adapter and a small air compressor. Bike is up on its center stand waiting, but I’m taking the mrs and my daughter to the beach today. . I’ll mess with this stuff tomorrow morning.
 

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Just try to make sure the inside of the wheel is clean at the valve hole, and those should be leak-free.

Maybe it will warm up in July, and the beach won't feel so cold!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the tip. Weather is beautiful today water is chilly again though. But summer has just begun haha!
 

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I don't recommend the screw on type, they tend to leak. Use the solid rubber ones, put soapy water on them, and pull them through from inside the wheel till the seat properly. I use the straight ones. I get them from Cycle Gear. They are not crazy expensive. There is more than one size of valve stem. You will need to measure the hole. I have used car valve stems on bikes before, and if they are the right size, they work fine. The rear one is pretty close as far as getting an air chuck on it. I have a couple of metal "valve stem extenders" for use on cars where the valve is not long enough to fit through the hole in a wheel cover. I screw one on the rear valve, and bend it the rubber stem slightly, which gives me plenty of room to put air in the tire. You should change the valve stems every time you change the tires. Looks like whoever installed those tires didn't.
 

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I've used the screw on valve stems for 40+ years and never had a leak. The 2 years working at a bike shop we never had one bike come in with a leaking valve stem.

I'd trust something I control the tightness over one I don't. Just about all cast wheel bikes use them and I've still not read about any problems with them leaking.
Obviously you need to instal the correct size. Any parts dept for any metric bike can sell you the proper size valve stem.

I have used "Bikemaster" stems for years. Available many places online:
https://www.jpcycles.com/motorcycle-valve-stems-and-caps

Actually I have also changed tires without changing the screw on valve stem and again, never had a leak...

But I will tell you not to use aluminum caps. They can oxidize and "weld" themselves on to the stem. Only use steel or rubber/plastic caps. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the input. Between last night and this morning it took me about 4 hours collectively to finish. First I couldn’t get the C clamp to stay put but eventually had success there, valve went right in. The PITA was getting the bead to reseat! I was using brute force at first but then remembered I’m not 25 anymore and went to buy a longer ratchet strap, strapped it up, hooked up my little Slime air compressor and in less than two minutes heard a very satisfying “pop” as it went back in.
And for the record, I did not remove the wheel, after last nights struggling I was certain I was going to have to but I got lucky for once
 

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Threaded metal stems are the go-to for off-road, they don't leak or rip out. Have to install them not too loose, not over-tightened. The ones on my '74 have been there since I bought the wheels, in 1994.
 
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