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Discussion Starter #1
I have a broken shift shaft, inside the block, of my 2006 750. Went to shift from 2nd to 3rd and the lever just fell away from the bike. This will be the 3rd major job on this bike and the second time to break it down all the way (1st was to replace the fried electrical system). In my opinion, a newer bike should never need this much work. Anyway, here's my question: When the shop broke it down to replace the stator, etc. when I got the bike back, the shift lever was higher that before the repair. Quite a lift to shift into higher gears, but I got used to it. 2000 miles later, the shaft breaks. Is there any chance the old repair caused the new disaster? I'm debating whether it's worth it to even fix this bike after this many problems or sell is as a project bike. Thanks.
 

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It's doubtful the shop broke the shift shaft. Most likely what they have done is when they put it back together, the didn't get the shift lever set right, they just stuck it on there.
The shift lever is splined so that it can be adjusted to the riders preference for height.
There is a bolt on the backside of the shifter that you can take out and readjust it.
If the shop would have picked the engine up by the shifter, it most likely would have busted it right then.
The fact you went 2K miles before it broke is a good sign they didn't break it.
These bikes were prone for shifter failures on older bikes and they made an updated linkage for it. Unfortunately, you have to tear the engine down to fix it.
But it don't have to be torn completely down. You will need to split the cases, but the shift lever can be accessed from the right side. All you would need to do is take off the right side case and replace the parts. Unfortunately the cylinders have to come off as well as the clutch assembly and the cam chains and such for the right side. But the crank and transmission can stay in the left side case.
I hope I haven't confused you too bad.
 

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I've been reading about the shift rod breaking and that is a common problem, I found a few threads where someone just had to remove the clutch & Clutch basket and got to the rod without pulling the engine. Very tight space from what I understand, but they got it done. I have the same problem with the project bike I just picked up. If I get it running this weekend then I'm going to try that route 1st before I pull the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's doubtful the shop broke the shift shaft. Most likely what they have done is when they put it back together, the didn't get the shift lever set right, they just stuck it on there.
The shift lever is splined so that it can be adjusted to the riders preference for height.
There is a bolt on the backside of the shifter that you can take out and readjust it.
If the shop would have picked the engine up by the shifter, it most likely would have busted it right then.
The fact you went 2K miles before it broke is a good sign they didn't break it.
These bikes were prone for shifter failures on older bikes and they made an updated linkage for it. Unfortunately, you have to tear the engine down to fix it.
But it don't have to be torn completely down. You will need to split the cases, but the shift lever can be accessed from the right side. All you would need to do is take off the right side case and replace the parts. Unfortunately the cylinders have to come off as well as the clutch assembly and the cam chains and such for the right side. But the crank and transmission can stay in the left side case.
I hope I haven't confused you too bad.
Thanks for the response and advise. I'm pretty much confused most of the time anyway, so that's ok. I agree, the shop didn't do it, I've always had good dealings with them. I'm just pissed that this bike keeps having these expensive problems. Maybe 3rd time is a charm...have to save my pennies before I tackle this one.
 

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OK, I have been working on a project bike that I got with the same problem. Right now I have the engine out and the whole thing tore apart to split the cases and get to that darn shift rod. My I add that this is the 1st time I ever tore an engine down too. I looked at trying to get to it without splitting the cases, but it darn near impossible, so I went the whole way tearing it down. The rod itself isn't that much, it's all the time and the cost of replacement gaskets that will get you. I'm figuring with doing it myself and cost of Gaskets, Silicone, etc. it will probably cost me about $200 in parts. From what I hear most shops are at around $800 +/- to do the job.
 

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Yep, shops can be damned expensive. I'm going to tear mine down completely this winter and go through the entire engine. I wish these were easier to work on, but I guess we have to suffer because of the engineers. :(
I'm going to make it a 750, I'm going to replace the shifter assembly, going to add the oil pump chain guide, and aftermarket clutch plates, and I'm going to send the cams off to get them reground. Bump the lobe height up a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK, I have been working on a project bike that I got with the same problem. Right now I have the engine out and the whole thing tore apart to split the cases and get to that darn shift rod. My I add that this is the 1st time I ever tore an engine down too. I looked at trying to get to it without splitting the cases, but it darn near impossible, so I went the whole way tearing it down. The rod itself isn't that much, it's all the time and the cost of replacement gaskets that will get you. I'm figuring with doing it myself and cost of Gaskets, Silicone, etc. it will probably cost me about $200 in parts. From what I hear most shops are at around $800 +/- to do the job.
Thanks for your response. I wish I had the guts to tear this thing apart myself. My shop quoted me around $2000 and 3 shops told me they won't touch it until winter arrives. Rode it all last winter and missed the entire spring and summer. Maybe since this bikes been apart 2 times already, I should just try doing it myself. It can't run any worse than it is now :)
 

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To my surprise there really isn't much to these engines. Watch Roach's video's once and you'll see, he tore his down much further than I did to check all the tolerances. The only specialty tools you will need is to pull the clutch basket off and the Rotor, My local shop helped me get them off (after I busted the clutch basket stud) and only charged me $5. And get a Clymers manual if you plan on doing it. I'm waiting now for my gaskets and washer that was missing from my shifter then I'll see how it goes getting back together.
 

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hmmmmm.....several failures on a newer Kawasaki. Should I say it. Ah.....oh sure. Get a Honda. :motorcycl

Sorry - couldn't resist. The VN750 I am rebuilding was GIVEN to me free cause the internal shift tie rod broke. He went out and bought a brand new Honda Fury. It no breaky.
 

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..have a vulcan good day!
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hmmmmm.....several failures on a newer Kawasaki. Should I say it. Ah.....oh sure. Get a Honda. :motorcycl

Sorry - couldn't resist. The VN750 I am rebuilding was GIVEN to me free cause the internal shift tie rod broke. He went out and bought a brand new Honda Fury. It no breaky.
If shifted properly, Shift rods are unlikely to break. They are quite Heavy Duty.

.....just sayin'

:smiley_th
 

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From the pictures I've seen of the broken shift rod, the internal linkage gets bend on down shift. Down shift pushes the linkage, Upshift pulls the linkage. Some folks tend to stomp the shifter instead of pressing it. The gear end of the linkage is only gonna go so far no matter how far the shifter end travels. Excessive pushing will cause the link to bend in a U shape. Look how long the shift lever is. Puts a heck of a lot of pressure on the linkage no matter how you shift. Weak linkage, maybe. Rider caused breakage, more than likely.
 

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As good as the Vulcan 750 is, it has a long list of known problems, many of which are design problems. The shifter is one of them. It shouldn't break that easy. Dropping the bike on the shifter will also break it inside. The ACCT issue, the balancer problem, noisy grabby clutch, having to pull the engine to replace the stator, excessive maintenance required on the final drive, and even the flimsy tool box door are some of it's issues. The engine also has about twice as many parts as it needs (Honda 750 Shadow has way less parts, and no known mechanical issues). But WHEN things are right, the Vulcan is the best bike out there. Mine has made it past 80,000 miles with nothing but ACCT problems, and I love it, but I would not consider tearing down such a high mileage engine to fix something like a broken shifter. Maybe not even a stator.
 

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The stator and the balancers are not a bad job. I would not want to split the case to repair the broken shift link.
 

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..have a vulcan good day!
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The stator and the balancers are not a bad job. I would not want to split the case to repair the broken shift link.
When my dampers went out...balance gear ground out the left casing (replaced)...engine split, I had New_Rider9984 install the "replacement" 8mm shift link/rod...replacing the (old) installed 5mm shift link/rod....($4.86 ?).

:smiley_th
 
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