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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all. I was driving my truck to work this morning and hit a deer. Last Monday morning I was on the bike and one ran across the road less than 20 feet away, didn't hit it. And the Tuesday after Memorial Day same damn thing happened. I've hit a total of 6 deer with the truck, two major damage, the rest not much of any damage, this morning included. So I might sell my bike, it's just getting a little scary.
Last year around here near Warsaw, a guy was on his bike and a deer ran into him and he died. So can you blame me? Not sure if I am for sure gonna sell, but I probably will, being alive is more important and since I'm new to the bike thing, it won't be that heart breaking. Any comments?
Later.
:zzz:Marc
 

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Dharma, choice is yours and no one should fault you. Deer is an issue here during the hunting season. Hogs year round. I ride to work pretty much year round. My suggestion, if the road is 4 lanes stay in the inside lane to give yourself a little more reaction time. If the area is a frequent deer crossing avoid it on the bike or find a different route. Also, you might limit your ride times to daylight hours. I know some riders in South Texas that absolutely will not ride after dark due to deer at any time of the year.
 

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How about those deer whistle things?
 

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^Nobody's trained the deer to know they're supposed to avoid them! If you see a deer, slow down! They are unpredictable, just like a cage at an intersection, only worse.
 

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Glenn C.
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It's your choice man, but take this in mind:
If you're going to give up riding because of deer, you might as well give up driving your vehicle too.
It has been proven than more people die in auto to auto accidents per year than motorcycle to deer crashes.

I don't know, i may be wrong, but it depends on where you live. I live up north in Minnesota, so because we don't ride bike all year round, and there are alot of winter/snow/ice vehicle fatalities.

Just my 2 cents tho.
 

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On His Lady Vulcan
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I was going to recommend the same thing that GIMPYRDR already said. Deer are nocturnal creatures (and taste great on my plate), so if you truly enjoy being on two wheels then keep the bike and just do day trips around town or what have you. If its just a means of transportation for you but you would feel safer in a cage then by all means sell the thing.
 

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Ba dum dum, ching...
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Freakin' dear! You can't swing a dead cat around here without hittin' a dear and the stinkin whimpy pansys in Trenton keep passing laws to restrict hunting even more. So the dear keep reproducing even more. I've pretty much stopped riding at night because of them (when I do ride at night I ride way below the speed limit and keep my head on a swivel).

R
 

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I know what you mean. There should be a period of time with unlimited kills. Gotta thin out the herd here in west central Illinois.
 

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Concert connoisseur
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I live in the hills and have had a few close calls this year already, usually in the morning or at dusk. they are definately thicker at dark. I try not to ride at night too but as said in an earlier post, I slow way down and make my eyes do that lizard thing looking too the left and right at the same time. and on the 4 lane when I get to it I use the left lane if the grass is high on the right.
 

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I rode to my sisters one afternoon and saw Mama and 3 doe on her neighbors lawn in broad daylight. I turned the corner and there was Pop. I hit the breaks hard and was maybe 30 yards from him. That's the closest I've even been to a buck. The thing was frickin' huge. We have a big problem with them in PA too.

You should get a hunting party of 35 people, arm them with mac tens, and disappear for a couple weeks. Yes, deer are nocturnal and a big pain in the arse - they're also delicious.
 

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They are definitely unpredictable. I was 10yrs when a friend of my Dad's was killed ON his motorcycle by one. The deer ran across the road in front of him, got to the other side, did a 180, and knocked him off the bike. According to the witness's behind him, the bike traveled roughly 100 yrds before it fell over. Of course, he wasn't wearing a helmet either.
 

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MANIC MECHANIC
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x2 to the delicious part. but growing up and learning to ride in rural east tennessee they were just a part of life i even hit a carcass laying in the road once topped a hill and there it was. but if you arent used to it I wouldnt blame you at all
 

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There are lots of moving hazards out there, like dogs.
 

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Bandito
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Just had some BBQ deer last night for dinner :)

I love to ride right around 7pm during the summer because it starts to get cooler in this area, but that is the time when the deer start to come out as well, it is a chance to ride at that time but I am not going to let it stop me from riding. Alot of the riding I do is out in the country with wide open farms, so alot of the times you will see the deer right on the edge of the wood line and can keep an eye on them, no close encounters yet.

I do agree with the over population problem, waiting on a crop damage permit to go clear some out of a friends farm. Even with the over pop. the state does not easily grant crop damage permit's.
 

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I live by two rules of thumb when it comes to deer:
1. Stay off the bike during the rut - hormones are running amok and the deer have no sense at all. I'll only ride during the daytime then, and I, too, develop lizard-head.
2. If you see one deer, slow down and be prepared to come to a full stop - there's invariably at least one more behind the one you just saw.

Oh, there's a third one: sometimes they just pop up like a whack-a-mole game and there's not a darned thing you can do about it. Had a small one do over $4K damage on my Honda Element this winter - came around a bend and <whump>.

In terms of selling the bike, as folks have said, that depends on what level of risk you're willing to handle. I do think there are things you can do to ride more attentively (such as points 1 and 2 above), but if point 3 feels like too much of a risk, then that's ok - no one would fault you for selling the moto and going back to something that has airbags.
 

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carbon unit
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Couldn't have said it any better.
 

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There are lots of moving hazards out there, like dogs.
Been there ,hit that, that is when I found out how long jeans last on pavement,I'd say ten feet if you are lucky.
 

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Any human activity involves some level of risk of injury or death. Lying in bed involves a relatively low risk. Lying in bed with someone else's spouse involves higher risk. Lying in bed with someone else's spouse while the unsuspecting spouse is elsewhere in the house involves significantly higher risk. It's all about the risk that you're willing to accept. I love riding my bike on back roads and, believe it or not, I love riding at night (very peaceful, the scenery is totally different, it's cooler, fewer cages on the road, etc.). I try to avoid enjoying those two things at the same time, however, since I'd rather not run the risk of waffling or being waffled by the myriad nocturnal creatures that prowl about (deer, skunks, armadillos, etc).

During those times of year when my daily commute has me going to work at dawn or coming home at dusk, I definitely develop the lizard-head and slow down. I've not had any truly close calls with deer so far, probably partly through luck and partly because the ones I did see, I saw in plenty of time to slow down. And yes, where there's one, there are more; you just haven't seen them yet.

--FA
 

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There are lots of moving hazards out there, like dogs.
It's odd that you say that because I had an odd encounter. When I went through the MSC, the instructor's last lesson for us was how to avoid dogs. I'm not sure it was in the curriculum, but he explained that dogs will run angles to meet you at a certain point where you will be, so when you see one running out, slow down so the dog will be forced to change it's angle. Then speed up to blow by it. The first week I was out, a pit bull ran out of a yard, I slowed down, he cut back, and I sped past him. Worked great. Without that little story, I'm sure it would have been different.
 

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^ Yes, that works well on the Vulcan. Not quite so well on my Rebel which doesn't have head snapping acceleration.

I've owned and trained dogs most of my life and read their body language pretty well. When I encounter a dog that chases on a route I ride frequently, rather than have to deal with the dog over and over, I'll resort to some training. Dogs enjoy chasing and don't expect the chased object (deer, car, bike) to stop. So I let them chase me for a distance to get them away from their home territory where they feel more comfortable are are apt to be more defensive/aggressive. Then I quickly stop the bike, look directly at the dog, and say NO! in a loud voice. Quite often they will turn tail and run home. If they don't, I get off the bike, run straight at them and yell NO! again. Never had one that didn't tuck his tail and run away. After a few sessions, they usuallly learn not to chase bikes or identify the sound of my bike and don't bother me. For the slow learners, that's another reason to start carrying. This parish (what Louisiana calls counties) has a leash law that is seldom kept in the rural areas.
 
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