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aka Smokymtnvulcan
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41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering, since I'm having to run my VN750 on the battery until I can get it in the shop and have either or both the stator/regulator replaced, would it hurt to use a car battery so I don't mess up my new maintenance free battery?
 

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1,750 Posts
How about a lawn mower battery? They're between the size of a bike and car battery.

DT
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
I wouldn't think the larger amps of a car battery would be a good idea.
 

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Now what
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400 Posts
**I wouldn't think the larger amps of a car battery would be a good idea. **

No, it should be ok. The battery doesn't have enough voltage to cause the R/R to dump excess current. If a car battery could be safely mounted behind the driver, on the seat or a rack, and sufficiently large cables run to the originial cables, it would work. Bike would run for quite a while, I'd think. Be quite the hazard in an accident though. Any battery flying around in a wreck could cause quite a bit of damage. That would probably nix the idea for me.
 

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149 Posts
If you hook your MF batt to a charger after every time you ride it shouldn't hurt It. just as long as you keep your rides short so you don't completely drain your battery. I wouldn't suggest this for a long term solution, just till you can get the charging sys. back in order.
I've got a car batt I keep in my shop for jumping and testing ATV's, I've been useing it for almost a year now like that. I just charge it about once a week to keep the voltage up. I've completely drained it several times, and it hasn't hurt it yet. This is just food for thought. The main thing is do only what you feel comfortable with. :)
 

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Skierbob
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20 Posts
I don't know if a gel battery is the same but it is very bad to fully drain a lead/acid battery. The plates apparently get lead sulfate deposits on them when the electrolite is depleted which greatly lessens the capacity and therefore the life of the battery. Consumer Reports did a study of this and concluded that it was one of the primary reasons that lead/acid batteries died. They even went so far as to test many different car batteries and rate them according to how many full discharge cycles they could tolerate before loosing a significant portion of their cold cranking ability. The winners could handle only several. The loosers one or two.

Recharge your batteries ASAP after they get discharged!

As for driving your bike to the dealer with a dead charging system, I would try to avoid strapping a car battery to the bike if possible for safety reasons. You might try pulling the top two fuses (headlights and tailights) if you don't think you can make it without running dead first. Hopefully with a friend following you to give you a ride home, this shouldn't be very dangerous. When you leave your bike, either have the dealer throw a charger on it or bring the battery home for charging.

Good luck!
 

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Love My Baby
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1,165 Posts
I wouldn't recommend using any battery not specifically designed to work with the VN750, especially if it can't be properly mounted in the battery compartment. You're limited by size, as a more powerful battery will probably be larger in size. Take your chances with short rides and recharge the battery with a battery tender.
 

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aka Smokymtnvulcan
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41 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Wow, some really good suggestions here. I hadn't thought about the safety factor with the weight of the battery, however I do have a sturdy rack and a container for the battery. I thought of using the car battery when I read it was alright to jump start with a car, but the car couldn't be running, just using the isolated battery. As far as the amperage, the load determines the amperage, so the system shouldn't demand anymore amperage than with a bike battery (Power = Amps x Voltage). I would think the bigger danger would be when the voltage drops, causing the current to increase. Thanks everyone for some really excellent thoughts.
 

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Skierbob
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20 Posts
Your bike's current draw on the battery will not increase as the battery runs down and the voltage drops. A DC source into resistive loads will put out less current as the voltage drops, not more (I = V/R).

For AC sources driving motors and other devices, lower voltage results in higher current because the load is inductive and needs to draw more current to continue putting out the same power (Watts = V x A). This is the reason that motors, refrigerators, and other things can burn out during a brownout. They try to keep running at the same speed driving the same load and need more current to do that.

Running down either a bike or car battery while your charging system is not working, will not damage the other electricals of your bike, only the battery itself if discharged too deeply and even worse if left that way for long.
 

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aka Smokymtnvulcan
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41 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
You are absolutely correct............I forgot about this being rectified DC! I thank you for pointing this out to me. Good people on here giving good information!
 
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