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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help me understand the draw to the typical big displacement cruisers...

Our "lowly" 750 is rated at 66HP with a dry weight of 483lbs.
The Vulcan 1500 is rated at 64HP with a dry weight of 637-743 lbs.
Twice the engine size, 154-260lbs more weight, same overall power, lower mpg.
Can I just ride with a passenger or bolt on some weights and get the same experience?

To be clear, I want to buy a Vulcan 2000, but at least that comes with 37 more horsepower.

I don't get the draw of the 1500 over the 750.
 

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Because it sounds bitch’n ? 😂

What are the torque numbers on the two bikes?
I think comparing big cruisers to one another is pointless as most are not buying these bikes because of horsepower numbers, they buy them for looks. 😉
 

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It's a different ride on the big cruisers, you definitely won't be whipping around traffic or carving turns like you might on the VN.

Don't know about the bigger Kawi, but I rode the C90 Boulevard, which is over eight feet long. It forces a more laid back ride, the transmission won't let you be quick even if you try. I compared the shifting to driving a tractor.

The experience was about the same on the HD Ultra, but it's got the torque to keep it interesting. I'll say the handling was a bit more sporty than the Boulevard, but the VN is obviously more nimble.

A lot more passenger room on the big ones! More room for the rider as well.
 

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Doing 300-400 miles a day with gear on a 1500 is much less fatiguing compared to a small bike.
Lower RPMs, heavier cruising weight, higher weight capacity, bigger tires, are good for interstate travel.
The determining factor is how and where do you ride? I passed up a great deal a few months ago. It was a beautiful 1500 Drifter for $3k. Didn't get it cuz I like to get stupid on the twisties and avoid the interstates.
A 750 or less is ideal for my needs. Besides, very few baggers can keep up with me on runs 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Because it sounds bitch’n ? 😂

What are the torque numbers on the two bikes?
The 1500 has 1.75 times as much torque, but the 750 is geared 1.7 times higher. The butt dyno will feel about the same in 5th gear on both bikes.

I know you don't buy cruisers for speed, but I would have expected the bigger ones in the same family to at least keep up. If only they could get that mighty 1500 to spin to 8k rpm!

As for overall stability, I could have used that going through western Kansas!
 

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It's all about torque. I personally like to rev it out, which is why I loved my Vulcan 750 and currently love my Versys 650. Revving out to 9k is so much more fun than shifting like I'm driving a truck
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Because ………… “ There is no replacement for displacement “
Hey, long time no see! I'm still loving the bike! I'm about to hit 23k miles on her.

Ya, I still wish the bigger engines could spin faster than they do. Kinda like Harley did with their Sportster S. The outgoing 1200 cc did 59 HP 79 TQ. The new 1250cc does 121 HP 94 TQ. HP amd TQ seems like having your cake and eating it too! You can lope along at a low RPM on the highway with gobs of torque or drop a few gears and tear up the twisties at 8000 RPM.

I fear with the coming electric vehicles that engine development will slow down or stop. 😓

Don't get me wrong, I'd be driving a Tesla Model 3 if I could. But I can't bring myself to ride something that isn't constantly exploding underneath me.
 

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Funny, no one has mentioned the most important factor here. Power to weight ratio. 114 baggers, Nomads, Drifters can't keep up with my son on the VN because they weigh in at over 1100lbs or more.
 

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Funny, no one has mentioned the most important factor here. Power to weight ratio. 114 baggers, Nomads, Drifters can't keep up with my son on the VN because they weigh in at over 1100lbs or more.
Probably falls under handling.
 

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Funny, no one has mentioned the most important factor here. Power to weight ratio. 114 baggers, Nomads, Drifters can't keep up with my son on the VN because they weigh in at over 1100lbs or more.
I had to explain this concept to my buddy a few years ago. He had an 06 VN1500, loaded I think it was near 850lb, not to mention his “skinny” 275lb self. He was surprised that my “small” 750 was keeping up and had gear to spare bolting down the AC expressway.

In fact here’s a pic of that day

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive lighting Motor vehicle
 

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I had to explain this concept to my buddy a few years ago. He had an 06 VN1500, loaded I think it was near 850lb, not to mention his “skinny” 275lb self. He was surprised that my “small” 750 was keeping up and had gear to spare bolting down the AC expressway.

In fact here’s a pic of that day

View attachment 54715
Yup! :cool:

Here's one of mine....

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive fuel system
 

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Ha, nice shot, please tell me “hillbilly hotdogs” are as good as they sound
Omg yes. Granted I've only tried one, the hard part is deciding which dogs you want.

I will definitely go back, even if I have to drive a cage.

The dining area is two school buses put together. Take a Sharpie with you so you can autograph the walls, ceiling, table, etc.

That's my buddy Roger, RIP, he rode the Boulevard.

Human Flash photography Fun Leisure Chair
 

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That’s what I was hoping you’d say about a place like that!

my condolences on your buddy..
Thanks, it's still a bummer, his brother rides the HD Ultra in the pic, police model. We still miss ole Haji, and all the good times.

We grabbed the hotdogs after visiting Mothman and all his friends, Chief Cornstalk, etc. I might put together some pics in a thread. That's almost our last ride.

It's definitely a unique dining experience, and the dogs are real, not just gimmick green weenies. I suppose they make good burgers too.

I had to get those pics quick and get busy eating, those two can put it away fast and they're ready to get back on road.

Forum member Denny always wanted to meet there, he rode up from Kentucky. Denny just sort of faded away and we haven't heard from him in a long time.
 

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I've ridden some of everything, from 1950s basically motorized bicycles to baggers. Stability. Space. Load capacity. Passing power on the interstate where you fight the wind, not weight. Sound. Bragging rights. Small d!ck size or peer pressure. Plenty of legit reasons and some questionable ones.

Carrying a load isn't the same as having a heavy drivetrain down low. Also peak power doesn't matter IRL as much as total area under the power curve, especially across the midrange where you use it most.
 

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Power to weight is a factor here, but I think the question asked was simply why doesn’t the 1500cc bike have twice the horsepower of a 750cc motorcycle, as it’s twice as big?
The answer here is mass. A 750 V twin means one cylinder displaces 375cc. A 1500cc twin then works out to 750cc per cylinder. Yes, twice as big, and that means a piston twice as large and twice as heavy. Add in the heavier connecting rods, a heavier crank, bigger valves, and just an overall bigger motor, that extra mass will need more energy to move. If it is twice as big it will take twice the energy to move all those parts. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that the horsepower from either motor would be about the same. But the extra mass would increase torque.
Talking just V twins here, the smaller motor should be able to rev higher (higher redline). V twins are also a bit “unbalanced” as power strokes between the two angled cylinders isn’t as even as say an inline four where you can have two pistons going down as the other two are going up
Mass wise look at a 1000cc in-line four. One cylinder displaces 250cc. A 1000cc twin has 500cc displacement per cylinder. That extra mass will limit its redline. (That and of course valve size and duration)
The Yamaha R6 is an in-line four that displaces 598cc’s..... which works out to about 150cc per cylinder. This reduction in moving mass allows the bike to have a redline of 17,500 rpms.
Obviously using the technology of titanium valves, ceramic pistons, etc can raise not only redlines but overall engine performance.
Most V twin (cruisers) are as I said made to appeal to your eyes, actual horsepower isn’t their selling point. With some good engineering ($$$$) you can have a big V twin with impressive power. But again, that’s not the main selling point.
BMW makes a sport bike that at 1000cc puts out 200hp on a bike that weighs close to 400 pounds. There’s your power to weight ratio.

As I’m talking physics here, the reason the bigger (heavier) motorcycle are “smoother” to ride is directly due to that extra mass. When your tire hits a small bump, your suspension tries to absorb it by compressing. But looking at it as action-reaction, the wheel moves up, “pushing” the spring up...against the frame of the bike. If the bike is light, that “push” will bounce the bike up. If the bike is heavy, it won’t bounce it up as much. Your forward momentum on a heavy vehicle simply takes more energy to deflect than it does on a lighter vehicle. Newton’s second law, you can easily deflect a ballon but not as easy a bowling ball. This is why Cadillacs in the 60’s were considered to have the smoothest ride, they just were huge and heavy, so their momentum down the road was hard to alter.
My 600+ pound Yamaha FJR made roads I thought were just bumpy as hell on my Vulcan seem glass smooth.
If you have ever rode a Goldwing down the interstate you’ll understand.
I’m not advocating big motorcycles here. Im
Saying if you want to tour the US coast to coast, bigger is better.
If you want to tear up the twisty roads around where you live and don’t need to go 200 miles, smaller is better. I had more fun on my 400cc Yamaha RD doing that than any motorcycle I’ve owned.
But riding 500+ miles day .... the FJR was the winner
 

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Hillbilly hot dogs are great! Anyone tried the ice cream shop there (assuming it's still there)? Excellent way to top off a great dog.
 
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