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Clint '89
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183 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
had to find a jump after leaving the library today.
should I buy a new battery or is there anything i can do that's cheaper.
 

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Registered
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79 Posts
Get a new maintenance free, ( absorbed glass mat ) battery. They have AGM marked on them. Best bang for the buck. Then put voltmeter on battery, run motor to about 4000rpm and verify you're getting 13 to 14.5 volts from the charging system.
 

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Search Goddess
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2,002 Posts
If you have a maintenance free battery, have it load tested
If you have a wet cell battery, check the water levels (they need to be check every two weeks, another reason to get a maintenance free battery!)
 

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Clint '89
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183 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
yeah its wet ill check the levels, ill get a new battery when i have some extra cash... this guy has replaced my car for the summer, lol.
 

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The Professor
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3,147 Posts

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Clint '89
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183 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I can buy distilled water at an automotive shop for like 3 or 4 dollars.

thanks for all the help and support guys.

Automotive starter batteries (usually of lead-acid type) provide a nominal 12-volt potential difference by connecting six galvanic cells in series. Each cell provides 2.1 volts for a total of 12.6 volt at full charge. Lead-acid batteries are made up of plates of lead and separate plates of lead oxide, which are submerged into an electrolyte solution of about 35% sulfuric acid and 65% water[2]. This causes a chemical reaction that releases electrons, allowing them to flow through conductors to produce electricity. As the battery discharges, the acid of the electrolyte reacts with the materials of the plates, changing their surface to lead sulfate. When the battery is recharged, the chemical reaction is reversed: the lead sulfate reforms into lead oxide and lead. With the plates restored to their original condition, the process may now be repeated.

Fluid level

Car batteries using lead-antimony plates would require regular watering top-up to replace water lost due to electrolysis on each charging cycle. By changing the alloying element to calcium, more recent designs have lower water loss unless overcharged. Modern car batteries have reduced maintenance requirements, and may not provide caps for addition of water to the cells. Such batteries include extra electrolyte above the plates to allow for losses during the battery life. If the battery has easily detachable caps then a top-up with distilled water may be required from time to time. Prolonged overcharging or charging at excessively high voltage causes some of the water in the electrolyte to be broken up into hydrogen and oxygen gases, which escape from the cells. If the electrolyte liquid level drops too low, the plates are exposed to air, lose capacity, and are damaged. The sulfuric acid in the battery normally does not require replacement since it is not consumed even on overcharging. Impurities in the water will reduce the life and performance of the battery. Manufacturers usually recommend use of demineralized or distilled water since even potable tap water can contain high levels of minerals.
Q do i fill it in the sink
A use distilled water only, trace elements in a water supply can diminish the life and power of the battery.

Charge and discharge

In normal automotive service the vehicle's engine-driven alternator powers the vehicle's electrical systems and restores charge used from the battery during engine cranking. When installing a new battery or recharging a battery that has been accidentally discharged completely, one of several different methods can be used to charge it. The most gentle of these is called trickle charging. Other methods include slow-charging and quick-charging, the latter being the harshest.

Some manufacturers include a built-in hydrometer to show the state of charge of the battery. This acrylic "eye" has a float immersed in the electrolyte. When the battery is charged, the specific gravity of the electrolyte increases (since all the sulfate ions are in the electrolyte, not combined with the plates), and the colored top of the float is visible in the window. When the battery is discharged (or if the electrolyte level is too low), the float sinks and the window appears yellow (or black). The built-in hydrometer only checks the state of charge of one cell and will not show faults in the other cells. In a non-sealed battery each of the cells can be checked with a portable or hand-held hydrometer. Batteries will last longer if not stored in a discharged state.

Sulfation occurs when a battery is not fully charged, and the longer it remains in a discharged state the harder it is to overcome the sulfation. This may be overcome with slow, low-current (trickle) charging. Sulfation is due to formation of large, non-conductive lead sulfate crystals on the plates; lead sulfate formation is part of each cycle, but in the discharged condition the crystals become large and block passage of current through the electrolyte.
Jumper cable connected to battery post. Hydrometer window visible by jumper clamp. White powdery corrosion products visible on top of battery. This Group 24F battery claims 525 cold cranking amperes and 125 minutes reserve capacity.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_battery

why then will adding more water keep the acid to water ratio, at a certain point doesnt the lead sulfate build up to an unrepairable level? can i just knock the cristals off the lead plate after discharging the battery? Please think about this problem with knowledge dont direct me to another maintenance free battery for sale. I think distilled water is like 3 or 4 dollars- I can replace the battery when I have 60 bucks- ontop of that these old batteries may be more reliable, even though they offer less initial power, to turn the starter.

lol me and my self- PWN.
 

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Search Goddess
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2,002 Posts
One of the other problems of a "wet" battery (besides checking water levels every two weeks) is the acid overflow. There is a vent hose on a wet battery and even if you never drop your bike the overflow hose is there for a reason.. Because they expect the acid to produce more then it can hold at some time or other!
When that happens the acid can hit some key components on your bike, like R/R connectors, CDI or the junction box. You can relocate your R/R but you can't relocate your junction box or CDI.
Costwise, the maintenance free batteries can be cheaper in the long run. A maintenance free kept on a battery tender can last 4 -5 years maybe. A wet cell usually has a life span of two years (cause we all know you aren't gonna check the levels every two weeks).
So MF battery - $80-90 every 4 years
Wet Battery - $60 every 2 years plus possible replacement of CDI, Junction box etc..
 

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Clint '89
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183 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
werd- thanks
 

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The Professor
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3,147 Posts
You can buy distilled water at any grocery store for 86 cents a gallon. :doh:
 
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