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Did you use a fast break in for your new engine?

  • yes

    Votes: 6 26.1%
  • No

    Votes: 9 39.1%
  • I didn't break in the engine when it was new

    Votes: 8 34.8%

  • Total voters
    23
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Discussion Starter #1
Do you believe that a fast break in (2nd, 3rd and fourth gear ran hard) is better than what most mfg's suggest which is very slow.... (Stay below xy amount of rpm's and or ab amount of speed overall?

Which ever you used, why and did you maintain your hp and still get a good piston ring seal?
 

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With the manufacturing techniques and production tolerances what they are today, I do not think "break in" is as important as it used to be.

With that said, I personally would use the engine over its entire rpm range regularly during the initial 500 miles, dump the oil, then business as usual.

My car says to use 5W-20 oil, this tells me that machining is pretty tight and that thicker oil formerly used to make up be higher tolerances is no longer needed.

Then again, I don't buy new. I let someone else take the initial depreciation. I buy 2 - 3 year olds with some manufacturers warranty left.

Jon
 

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HAWK
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Being a mechanic by trade, there is really no brake in time any more.
The new processes they make motors with are better than ever.
With the Micro honing your brake in is so short it is done usually before you even get on the bike.
 

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I don' believe in running a new motor to redline right off the bat but i run it all over the rpm range with a lot of 3/4 throttle bursts to 500 or so rpms the first 50 miles or so. The rings are the only thing you really need to seat as most of the bearings will wear in for a very long time. As evidenced by the higher than normal copper in the oil if you have a oil sample done.
 

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I am prone to breaking in an engine this way.When I am on the road I Open up the throttle to approx.3000 RPM through all the gears.When I am in the highest gear I will gradually open the throttle to about 5000 RPM for about an 8th of a mile. Then I back off the throttle.And I do this several times as I ride.For some reason I guess its old school stuff.I just like the rings to be broken in right not broken Yeah.........................................
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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6,141 Posts
My Vulcan was already broke in when I got it.
The only bikes I broke in were two of my dirtbikes. One brand new, one with a rebuilt motor. I wasn't extremely gentle on either one. Not that that's how I planned it, but once ya get the bike out into the woods, the dirt demon takes over and it's 'Ride for all you're worth' !! :motorcycl
I didn't totally red line them for miles at a time (kinda hard to do on trails), but they did see the entire RPM range, with a few drawn out runs up some nasty hillclimbs.
They both seemed to do just fine.

I agree with what some have said about not needing as much (if any) break-in like stuff used to.
Anymore, if something isn't going to be right during the break-in period, there's usually not much you can do about it, except take it in for warranty work.
 

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On a new motor I tend to follow the makers break in suggestions. Why? because they built the thing and should know more about what is needed than anyone else.
The biggest problem I have seen is many just do not read the "break in" proceedure carefully enough. No where does it say you can not run the engine at high rpms..which is what many think it says. It says, not to run the engine over a specified rpm for an "extended time". Big diffrence.
The first 100 miles or so I more or less baby it just to keep an ear out for something weird going on, but I do accellerate fairly hard going through the gears, many times going well over the rpm "limit"...the point being I do not cruise for long periods like this, at a constant high rpm.. and that is what the maker ios asking you to avoid.
There are many moving parts in your engine other than the pistons and rings. They should not be abused until they "bed in" some, and that is what the whole "break in" is about.
Many may argue this , but if it is my money, I will do whatever I can to hedge all bets so the engine lasts as long as possible...

KM
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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For everyones reading pleasure, HERE is an article on one guys 'How-To' for an engine break-in.
It is a kinda long one.
 

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Here is what my manual says for my Kaw V-twin powered JD lawn tractor, 18HP I know this is not a bike engine but the basic principles should apply also:
Engine Break-In
Poor engine performance can result from improper break-in or incomplete break-in time. Break-in is the period of initial run time that seats the piston rings to the cylinder wall.

New engines need to be run hard, under varying loads for at least 5 hours and may not be completely broken-in until after 50 hours. Follow these guidelines:

· Run engine at full throttle during operation. Use partial throttle only for 30-60 seconds to warm a cold engine.

· Run engine under load by mowing, blowing snow, etc.

· Check oil and coolant (if equipped) levels often. Top off as necessary.

· Follow the break-in service intervals.

Engine may show these symptoms during break-in:

· Excess exhaust smoke at startup and during operation.

· High oil consumption.

· Low power/compression.

· Slight surging at full throttle when not under load.

· Fuel in the oil.

I think max operating RPMS for this motor is factory set at 3600. Now a bike engine will rev much higher so I don't think you want redline a new bike constanly but this would suggest running new bike engines a little on the hard side would be better than a lot of low RPM around town put-put type riding.JMHO
 

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I agree with Knifemaker.... as far as the rest of the gears and moving parts go...
If it were a "rebuilt" motor.... run it till it gets good and warm then cut loose... did this on the motor I rebuilt in my car and it never burnt a drop of oil, or puffed any smoke at all. More full throtle "up-hill" runs to get full pressure on motor to seat the rings.

:motorcycl
 

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I take it real easy but never lugging the engine for the first several hundred miles. Starting out at 3000 to 3500 rpm range for the first hundred. Then gradually working up to the 4500 range more in bursts up and down . Then for the next 500 miles I work it up in the rpm but only for short periods of time a lot of up and down the rpm range.

It's hard to break old habits
 

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Well what I did(couldn't help myself)as soon as I got it home and unloaded was to crank it let it warm about a miniute then 0 to 60 back to 0 as fast as it would go.Then followed the factory recomendations.Impressive off the rack:D
 

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IMO the reason manufacturer suggests easy break in is all the law-suit happy idiots out there. i can see someone causing traffic accident and then blaming it on Yamazuki the manufacturer - "it is not my fault i didn't see **** on the road, it is the manufacturer that told me to speed/ drive it hard!".

however as far as i know most motors are pre broken in from the factory. they run them on a stand and do the first "20 mile" oil change (at least it is the case with our toyota and honda.) so today this entire hassle is less nessesery. i would think that at this point it is more important to slowly break in the breaks and scuff the new tires.
 

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Most engine builders break their engines in hard. Keep in mind that Kawasaki puts the exact same break-in sticker on every one of their bikes. I've bought 3 new from them. A VN750, ZG1000, and EX250. They all had the exact same break in recommendations despite the very different engines. I would break in hard, do plenty of heat cycles and engine breaking. Change the oil soon. There is lots of information out there about this. At the end of the day, there's not enough evidence one way or another to say definitively. On the other hand, no matter what you do, you probably won't seriously screw up your engine.
 
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