Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if any one had V Strom Dl 1000 input. I am considering it cause of the utilitarian and all around use of the bike. Plus, it sounds like the standard position might be more ergonomic and less harsh on the tail bone for long rides. Lots of aftermarket stuff...etc.
 

·
Old Twistie Sticks Rider
Joined
·
5,072 Posts

·
Straight roads are evil
Joined
·
580 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,959 Posts
An extrremely popular bike with those that own more than one bike...(sportbikes or ST's)

A great go anywhere -do anyting bike. Some prefer the "WeeStom" (the 650cc version) others like the extra power the bigger one has.

Only real complaint is it does not have the same "protection" a fully faired ST or GW has, but makes up for it with by being more versatile.

Other bike to look at is the newly imported ? Yamaha Tenere...( Is it available here now?)
Seems yes..
http://www.yamaha-motor.com/sport/products/modelspecs/651/0/specs.aspx
But the Vstrom has been in the US longer, so parts and accessories might be a bit more plentiful.

(I have V Strom handguards on my FJR BTW)

Keep in mind the seat height may be an issue if you be small, and even with a "tall" windscreen the bike is kinda "naked"...but still makes the top ten list for bikes to own.


KM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
It's still a street bike made to look like a dirt bike. There's not a whole lot of places it will go, that a regular street bike won't. It might be a little better on gravel roads or something, but that's about it. You wouldn't ever want to drop it, like you might have to do with a real dirt bike.

If you want to find a more capable 'dual sport' oriented dual sport, there are a lot of them out there. The 'baddest ass' of those is the KTM Adventure 990! We're talking 104.6hp in a dirt capable bike!

Of course, we're also talking a $15k machine! For those of us in the real world wanting a bike that is actually capable of doing some dirt duty, it's tough to beat the Kawasaki KLR650. It's about as 'street' oriented I'd want to go for a bike that was actually expected to do some real live 'dirt' time. Actually, for real dirt biking, something smaller and lighter works better. If you're tall, a Sukuki DRZ400 is a good bike.

Now, if you just want dirt bike style in a street bike, the larger bikes are indeed better 'street' bikes.

Good Luck!

KTM990 Info
http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/ktm/ktm_990_adventure 09.htm





 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,959 Posts
It's still a street bike made to look like a dirt bike. There's not a whole lot of places it will go, that a regular street bike won't. It might be a little better on gravel roads or something, but that's about it. You wouldn't ever want to drop it, like you might have to do with a real dirt bike.

If you want to find a more capable 'dual sport' oriented dual sport, there are a lot of them out there. The 'baddest ass' of those is the KTM Adventure 990! We're talking 104.6hp in a dirt capable bike!
I fail to see that much difference between the Tenere, The Vstrom and KTM. The KTM still weighs in at 209 kg dry ...so that's like 460 lbs , + whatever a full tank of gas is along with a few quarts of oil....moving towards 500 lbs...kinda heavy for an "dirt bike"

I think the OP here was looking at the Vstrom because it has some of the attributes of a ST bike , but with a more "sit up straight" riding position. I do not think he was intrested in doing that much off road riding.

A big thing to consider here, when picking out any bike you actually plan to travel on , (and by that I mean crossing state lines) is how big is the dealer network for that model. I know there are not alot of KTM dealers accross the US...but alot of Yamaha/Honda/Suzuki/Kawasaki shops.

I had myself considered a BMW 1300 GT before I decided on the Yamaha FJR. One of the reasons, other than cost, was if this was a bike I planned to do some traveling on, how many dealers are there scattered accross the US?

Yamaha has a few thousand licenced dealers, BMW...a few hundred. If I am in the middle of East Jesus NM and need a part, it be nice if the odds of finding a dealer near by are good.

Yes, I know if I had a Harley, that there are so many Harley shops in the US you can likely ride from one to the other on one tank of gas. The two problems are , one... Harley has a very limited selection ...they do not make a ST or Adventure bike....The other is if you have a Harley , you will need to have a shop every 100 miles ............. ;)


If you all remember....Obe Wan and Charly road a pair of BMW "adventure bikes" around the freaking world. So saying "It's still a street bike made to look like a dirt bike. There's not a whole lot of places it will go.." is a bit subjective.... ;)


KM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
I fail to see that much difference between the Tenere, The Vstrom and KTM.
You make some good points, especially regarding the dealer network... and Hardly Ablesons. hehe

This is from the article linked above...

As you can see, the new Multistrada comes out on top in terms of performance, but its 17" front wheel, street-biased tires and lack of engine or frame protection means its off-road capability is extremely limited. This comparison is very unflattering for Super Tenere; it's the heaviest bike here by 77lbs and, thanks to the strong Yen, it'll likely be the most expensive too. That weight, combined with the 19" front wheel and non-defeatable ABS is also going to limit its ability off-road.

All that means the BMW R1200GS and KTM 990 Adventure are, in our minds at least, still the leaders in this category. Both are genuinely capable off-road, fast on it and comfortable over long distances. If the high prices put you off, the Suzuki V-Strom looks like a bargain. Sure it'd need a couple grand in modifications before it could hit the dirt, but even with the add-ons, it'd still be the cheapest of this group.


I primarily ride dirt bikes. I bough the Vulcan so my wife could participate with the bikes. It's something we can both jump on for an afternoon.
I like a 250 dirt bike. They're nice and light, are fun to jump and ride hard, cover the roughest terrain well. My XR250R is a DIRT bike that I bought a light kit for and made street legal. It's a crappy street bike, has a 36" tall seat... but does just fine riding between trails.

For actual off roading, the large diameter 21" front tire allows the bike to ROLL over obstacles much better than a short street tire. Plus, suspension is everything in an off roader.

As for REAL offroad... All the bikes listed aren't that good. They're ALL too heavy and expensive if they get dropped. Of course, it also depends upon how you define 'Off Road'. I like going where no 4x4 truck could even go. Dropping the bike just kind of happens. Some call 'dirt' a gravel road with a few 3" deep creek crossings. For tearing up these dirt/gravel roads... and still being able to run 80mph on the streets, the heavy bikes being described would be just fine.

I guess it just comes down to a matter of taste, the true intended purpose of the bike, and the depth of a person's wallet. :)

Good Luck!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,959 Posts
I guess it just comes down to a matter of taste, the true intended purpose of the bike, and the depth of a person's wallet. :)
That is more or less my point. The "off road" capabilities of the Adventure bikes...The Stroms, Tenere, the BMW's and even the KTM in the mind of most street orinented buyers are bikes that can more easily cut down cleared trails, gravel or dirt roads, compared to a pure road bike. (like Ninjas,FJR's, and other sport bikes)

You really don't want to tear through the woods on them , for this a lighter "true" dirt bike is needed...shod with the appropriate off road rubber.


These ADVENTURE bikes kinda mimic the popularity of SUV's in the car world. Most folks that buy those big tall 4X4 SUV's never take them off road. ;)

So, back on topic...the V Strom does have more upright riding ergos...but the lack of rider protection compared to a sport touring bike or pure touring bike like a Gold Wing will over time be missed.

You can always add risers to your ST to sit up more, and or lower the seat.

Most folks coming from a cruiser take awhile to adapt to the different riding position like that on ST bikes . And many have added risers , lowered the seat, and even altered the pegs to "dial in" more comfort. It took me a good 1000 miles before my body adjusted to my FJR....now I can go all day with no complaints... something that was not possible with the Vulcan 750.

KM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Most folks coming from a cruiser take awhile to adapt to the different riding position like that on ST bikes . And many have added risers , lowered the seat, and even altered the pegs to "dial in" more comfort. It took me a good 1000 miles before my body adjusted to my FJR....now I can go all day with no complaints... something that was not possible with the Vulcan 750.

KM
I'm coming from the opposite angle. The NORMAL riding position for a dirt bike is standing up on the pegs. It allows the bike rock back and forth and float over bumps, keeping the seat from whacking you in the ass when the back tire hits bumps. LOL

With the Vulcan, the pegs are so far forward, you can't even really stand up on them at all! I see a bump, and go to stand up a bit to avoid the shock, and my feet are too far out in front of me to do much! Coming off a dirt bike, I'd probably be more comfortable with the riding position of an FJ.

I just got the vulcan at the tail end of the fall, so it will be interesting transitioning from laid back cruising with the wife and hitting it hard in the dirt with the older kids. So far, I find the street bike kind of boring, but scary. Cars and guardrails make me nervous! Dirt bikes are a blast for pushing and expanding your technical and riding skills. I love it, especially living in rural West Virginia, which is the only state 100% in the Appalachian mountain chain, meaning the entire state is full of hills and turns... and hard terrain is simply a matter of going out the back door. The dirt bikes are king when looking for 'excitement', but the Vulcan should be excellent for relaxing with the wife... especially since she's feeling a little left out in the motorcycle realm. :)

Those of you into the technical aspects of your riding that have access to trails... You should REALLY look into a true dirt bike. They are a blast, will build your skills, and you can beat on them as hard as you want without having to worry about getting in trouble with the law. :smiley_th

Good Luck!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,959 Posts
Those of you into the technical aspects of your riding that have access to trails... You should REALLY look into a true dirt bike. They are a blast, will build your skills, and you can beat on them as hard as you want without having to worry about getting in trouble with the law.
I have always believed, and even suggested ...that anyone new to riding a motorcycle should start with a small "off road" type bike, and spend as much time as they can riding in the dirt.

I also believe the reason I am here today, and a not messed up or dead biker is because the first few years I started riding I spent ALOT of it riding off road...and even competing in motorcross events... before I bought my first pure "street bike"...(a Kawasaki S2-350cc two stroke triple)

I just don't think you can learn all the things one can do...and can't do .. on a bike heavy street bike...as quickly, and as safely...as you can on a light weight off roader.

I know many riders , that like me, after fairly long years riding on the street have never been hurt on the road. Might be luck, but the one common thread I have seen with all of them is they started riding off road bikes first.

The few that went down for whatever reason, all seemed to do so without getting hurt...and without doing alot of damage to their bike.

This suggests to me that learning to ride off road, you learn how to fall...and how to fall gently...lol.


Again , no real proof here, just what I have observed over the years.


KM
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Do you think the 650 is good enough for me and my gear on the freeways in Texas? We sometimes get 30mph winds....
The vulcan with the memphis shades windshield seems to slow down quite a bit when headwinds present....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,446 Posts
You might want to right lane it but you should be fine. If it gusts crosswind, don't lean into it too much. Gusts stop abruptly so you might be in trouble. Staying relaxed and moving with it works well for me - heli and momo...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,959 Posts
Do you think the 650 is good enough for me and my gear on the freeways in Texas? We sometimes get 30mph winds....
The vulcan with the memphis shades windshield seems to slow down quite a bit when headwinds present....
I think most bikes would slow down going into a 30 mph head wind. ;)

The 650 Strom makes about 2? more horsepower than the Vulcan...and weighs a tad less. But is a bit more aerodynamic. So hard to say if it be that much better in the wind. Again not many bikes would be other than something with alot more power and a better drag coefficaint. (Like my FJR :smiley_th)

Generally, your best bet with cross winds is mass. The heavier the bike, the less it will be effected...everything else being equal.

Pick the bike that you WANT....deal with the wind when it comes up...;)

KM
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top