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History has taught me that mentioning oil and filters is “sensitive” lol. All jokes aside, there’s varying opinions. The key is to make sure it’s a motorcycle specific oil with no friction modifiers that will interfere with the clutch operation.
For me as far as tires I have used the Dunlop D404’s. I got a full set for about $170. Others swear by Shinkos.
I also went with Iridium plugs. I swapped them in when I did the pick up coil mod because I was done with the hot start problems.
 

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Rotella 15-40w is popular, but has been hard to find lately.

Nothing wrong with synthetic, switched all my cars to Mobil 1 last Fall due to the Rotella shortage. Still have a gallon of the Rotella for the bike.

Filters aren't too picky, though I don't care for Fram. For a while I used the chrome K&N with the hex nut on the end. The 17mm hex makes removal super easy. Some cars use the same filter, Honda Accord might be one. Wix, Super tech, they all work.

Any oil displaying "energy saving" will make the clutch slip.

Spline lube needs to be moly paste with a high percentage of moly... 60% maybe? Any brand you can find should be good.

I plan to get another set of Shinko tires, the 777 model this time, better weight rating.
 

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I will also vote for Shinko tires, those things held me upright in some serious rainstorms.
Oil, I always use synthetic, especially in bikes (unless it's the Harley clutch).
NGK plugs seem popular, seemed fine with this bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
... Nothing wrong with synthetic ... Still have a gallon of the Rotella for the bike.
Any Rotella alternative suggestions? Oh, and at the mention of Rotella, I immediately thought of this:
Food Ingredient Recipe Cuisine Tin

Don't suppose this would work in my crankcase, huh? 🤣😂😅


Spline lube needs to be moly paste with a high percentage of moly... 60% maybe? Any brand you can find should be good.
More excellent info as always. Which brand did you choose? And, any specific size of package? Like, do I need 8 oz, or half a gallon? Thanks man, I appreciate the suggestions!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I will also vote for Shinko tires, those things held me upright in some serious rainstorms.
Oil, I always use synthetic, especially in bikes (unless it's the Harley clutch).
NGK plugs seem popular, seemed fine with this bike.
So, my bike is not here at home with me, so I'm unsure of the size. 2006 750A. I have that user manual that I found here, but I want to make sure I order the right size. Do you know that off the top of your head?
 

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Any Rotella alternative suggestions? Oh, and at the mention of Rotella, I immediately thought of this: View attachment 54289
Don't suppose this would work in my crankcase, huh? 🤣😂😅




More excellent info as always. Which brand did you choose? And, any specific size of package? Like, do I need 8 oz, or half a gallon? Thanks man, I appreciate the suggestions!
8oz is plenty, larger bottles can be priced at $50 or higher.

Best bet is search moly paste on eBay. You want moly assembly paste, not moly grease or moly wheel bearing grease.

The standard was 60% moly, as in Honda Moly 60, but it looks like it's Honda M77 now. eBay has it around $15. Don't use canned tomatoes! :)

For tires, oversize is the way to go...

For oversize, you can use these with no problem and the oversize front will make the speedo correct.

110/90 - 19 front
170/80 - 15 rear
 

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I am not aware of "hot start" problems or the pick-up coil mod. Can you elaborate a little or point me to a link here with info?
Thanks for the recommendations!
Here’s a good link that outlines the procedure. The only thing I’ll say is this works really well if you need it. Plenty of folks never have this problem. In my case if I rode the bike a couple miles and shut it off it wouldn’t start back up right away.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I bought my 2006 with only 8k miles on it, and I've literally only driven it about a mile myself. I'm the second owner. The original owner has an honest and trustworthy reputation, and he says he never had a single problem with the bike. So, I'm kind of thinking that the old adage; 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it!' applies to me. It ran great when I got it, but it had been sitting for about a year or so. I went ahead and had the carbs rebuilt. I'm taking a road trip later this summer, so I'll hope to run into no problems. Thanks for the tips!
 

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History has taught me that mentioning oil and filters is “sensitive” lol. All jokes aside, there’s varying opinions. The key is to make sure it’s a motorcycle specific oil with no friction modifiers that will interfere with the clutch operation.
For me as far as tires I have used the Dunlop D404’s. I got a full set for about $170. Others swear by Shinkos.
I also went with Iridium plugs. I swapped them in when I did the pick up coil mod because I was done with the hot start problems.
I have those same exact spark plugs! It's a good feeling knowing those iridium plugs are good for a LONG LONG time. :) One less thing to worry about.
 

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I am not aware of "hot start" problems or the pick-up coil mod. Can you elaborate a little or point me to a link here with info?
Thanks for the recommendations!
My understanding is that the way the engine is tuned from Kawasaki to meet EPA/emmissions regulations can make it a bit more difficult to start-up a hot engine. For example, I'd need to crank and crank and crank...and crank...and apply some throttle...to get my Vulcan started. I'd also get INSANE backfires that sounded almost like a firework or a gun (but then again, I'm running straight pipes). I replaced the spark plugs from copper core to iridium and this made no noticeable difference for me.

So next, I performed the pick-up coil mod. This solved my hot-start problem for me. I don't have any "before" videos...but check out this "after" video showing off how insanely fast my bike starts with a hot engine.


If you have this problem, you may want to consider this mod. If you DON'T have this problem, then don't worry about it.
 

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This was what I used to deal with, this is after riding literally 1.7m from home, I pulled over to switch on my camera. It couldn’t of been more than 45 out. It doesn’t back fire this time but it did plenty of times before that. I don’t have straight pipes and people would still hit the deck

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
8oz is plenty, larger bottles can be priced at $50 or higher.

Best bet is search moly paste on eBay. You want moly assembly paste, not moly grease or moly wheel bearing grease.

The standard was 60% moly, as in Honda Moly 60, but it looks like it's Honda M77 now. eBay has it around $15. Don't use canned tomatoes! :)

For tires, oversize is the way to go...

For oversize, you can use these with no problem and the oversize front will make the speedo correct.

110/90 - 19 front
170/80 - 15 rear
So, I got my front tire today, Dunlop 110/90 -19. Definitely much bigger. still need to order the rear.
Regarding this moly paste... I don't see that M77 in 8 oz? That stuff is like $15 for 2.75 oz!?!?!?!

Is there a cheaper option?
 

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So, I got my front tire today, Dunlop 110/90 -19. Definitely much bigger. still need to order the rear.
Regarding this moly paste... I don't see that M77 in 8 oz? That stuff is like $15 for 2.75 oz!?!?!?!

Is there a cheaper option?
Everything has gone up with inflation and if they don't raise the price, they shrink the package, shrink-flation. It's pricey stuff.

3M was selling a super glue in a very small tube, but packaged inside a squeeze bottle five times larger than the actual tube.

You really just need to coat the surfaces where they come together, large globs will squeeze out and never serve the purpose.
 

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When my son bought his bike over 10 years ago we went to Honda and picked up a tube of their Moly 60 (they no longer have it). I actually bought 2 of them to be safe because I figured I would use it up fast.. I have now another Vulcan (bought it about 1 1/2 years after he got his) and service them regularly. I pull the wheel and "touch up" the splines every oil change and clean and re-lube them with each new rear tire. I am just about through one tube. It is only applied in a thin film like Spockster says and does not get thrown off nor make a mess. I have several other moly blended assembly lubes that I use for various other projects. They are not even close to the Honda stuff. Mostly. I do have a Sta-Lube moly/graphite that may work and is easier to find, maybe. It looks and feels (and even smells) very close but I cannot find the percentage of moly in it. It is for low/high temps and compression type applications. Unfortunately I don't remember what I used it on to check and see how it has held up. Some days my memory seems to come and go real fast so maybe I will remember why and when I bought it in the morning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Everything has gone up with inflation and if they don't raise the price, they shrink the package, shrink-flation. It's pricey stuff.

3M was selling a super glue in a very small tube, but packaged inside a squeeze bottle five times larger than the actual tube.

You really just need to coat the surfaces where they come together, large globs will squeeze out and never serve the purpose.
Ah, okay. An old biker I used to know had his own successful and popular shop in Waynesville, NC, and helped me change the tires on a 1986 Yamaha Virago 750. I remember him greasing the splines on that bike and he was like: "Remember, grease is your friend!" And I remember he used gobs of grease in there. So, hearing a thin layer is sufficient is new to me, thanks for the info!
 

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Ah, okay. An old biker I used to know had his own successful and popular shop in Waynesville, NC, and helped me change the tires on a 1986 Yamaha Virago 750. I remember him greasing the splines on that bike and he was like: "Remember, grease is your friend!" And I remember he used gobs of grease in there. So, hearing a thin layer is sufficient is new to me, thanks for the info!
It's pretty close tolerances in there, so if you lightly coat both pieces it should be good. If a small amount squeezes out when it goes together, that's perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It's pretty close tolerances in there, so if you lightly coat both pieces it should be good. If a small amount squeezes out when it goes together, that's perfect.
Alright, perfect! Thanks for all the great info, everyone! Going to try to bring her home tomorrow after work, and put her clothing back on. All I'm missing at this point is a rear tire and a new battery. I see so much information here, and it blows my mind how many mods there are, which leads me to believe that maybe these Vulcans are more of a pain in the bum than they're worth. I mentioned previously that I had an '86 Yamaha Virago, and honestly, it seems like this Vulcan is built much like that Virago was.

I'm hoping I don't need to do all this other stuff I'm reading about, like the rectifier. Oh, and before I forget, I remember reading something here about the bike seeming like it's out of fuel when it's not. What's that all about? Link to info would be great!
 
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