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I am about 200 lbs anyone have an idea on shock and air pressure settings.Waiting for the manual and thought I would find out what you guys use,Thanks:rockon:
 

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Love My Baby
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You can also adjust the shock rebound on the top of the rear shocks. The 2 setting is the factory default, but with more weight on the seat, the 3 setting may be more appropriate. It dampens the rebound (bouncing) a bit. You're only 200 lbs, so it might not really matter. I'm 172 and I like the 2 setting. When I take my wife for a ride I set it to 3 because she doesn't like to bounce. It does seem to help.
 

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I'm just a little over 200-I keep 15 psi in the shocks, and have the collars set on 3. That's what my back side seems to prefer. ;)
 

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Old Truck Junkie
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haynes manuel says 0 to 43 psi. It does not specify either way per each or to add together. IMHO it would be per each one.
 

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If I should be using a hand pump (as for a basketball) and not a compressor, what should I be using for the gauge? A tire pressure gauge is no good?

ETA: is this the sort of thing we're talking about? A "Topeak Mini-Master Pump w/Gauge" for $30 at the Sports Authority?

 

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I filled mine with nitrogen, figured if it was good for the tires it would be good for the shocks. PLUS that is what I fill the shocks on my sons 1/4 midget with
 

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I use a bicycle shock pump. Bike Nashbar (www.nashbar.com) and Performance Bicycle (www.performancebike.com) have them for around $30 +/-. eBay has a whole bunch of shock pumps listed as well.
 

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Eeep!

Shocks...20psi per shock...use a hand pump not a gas station air hose..
...or else what?

I happen to have used a small air compressor, meant for tires, when I first got the Vulcan. I just got the shock pump from a local bicycle shop at lunchtime today and will re-do the adjustment... But what irrevocable damage might I have done by using a compressor, how would I know, and what would I do about it?
 

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and the Adventure Cycle
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...or else what?

I happen to have used a small air compressor, meant for tires, when I first got the Vulcan. I just got the shock pump from a local bicycle shop at lunchtime today and will re-do the adjustment... But what irrevocable damage might I have done by using a compressor, how would I know, and what would I do about it?
Most service station air lines have too much pressure, and could blow out the shock seals if you weren't careful.
If using a compressor at home, and you set the regulator for the amount you want, you should be OK.
Just be sure to purge the airline first. So if you had the regulator first at, say, 100lbs, then adjusted it down to 20lbs, you'd still have the initial 100lbs in the line.
Press the release button in the air fill nozzle to release the extra 80lbs, then do the shock.
But the best bet is to use a hand pump.
 

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...or else what?

I happen to have used a small air compressor, meant for tires, when I first got the Vulcan. I just got the shock pump from a local bicycle shop at lunchtime today and will re-do the adjustment... But what irrevocable damage might I have done by using a compressor, how would I know, and what would I do about it?
An air compressor, even a small one, puts out a large volume of air. The air space inside the shocks is very, very small. By putting a large volume of air into a small space you have the possibility to over pressurize the shocks and blow the seals. Then you'll need new shocks.
The shocks are a little tricky. Checking them with a pressure gauge can bleed half the pressure off. That's why it is highly suggested that you use a hand pump with a gauge and to SLOWLY pressurize.
The rule of thumb for pressurizing the shocks is 10% of total weight of rider and equipment up to a maximum of 43 psi. So, at 200 lbs you would fill to 20 psi.
 

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An air compressor, even a small one, puts out a large volume of air. The air space inside the shocks is very, very small. By putting a large volume of air into a small space you have the possibility to over pressurize the shocks and blow the seals. Then you'll need new shocks.
I guess my extremely newbie question really boils down to this: how do I check if I've blown the seals and need new shocks? My ride feels rough, rather like I have no shocks; going over even relatively small bumps jars my whole bike, and I sometimes scrape my wheelwell leaning around a low-speed turn. My pre-load is dialed to "3" and I weigh about 195 lbs., so I hope I haven't destroyed my shocks. I suspect this may be the case since I did use a small air compressor (the portable emergency kind you can carry in the trunk of a car that also has a battery for jump-starting), and an inline tire pressure gauge, to put what I thought was 20 PSI into the shocks the second day I owned the bike...

Or, for all I know, it came with bad/blown out shocks. It is a 14+ year old bike with over 23,000 miles on it when I got it, after all.
 

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Old Truck Junkie
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I guess my extremely newbie question really boils down to this: how do I check if I've blown the seals and need new shocks? My ride feels rough, rather like I have no shocks; going over even relatively small bumps jars my whole bike, and I sometimes scrape my wheelwell leaning around a low-speed turn. My pre-load is dialed to "3" and I weigh about 195 lbs., so I hope I haven't destroyed my shocks. I suspect this may be the case since I did use a small air compressor (the portable emergency kind you can carry in the trunk of a car that also has a battery for jump-starting), and an inline tire pressure gauge, to put what I thought was 20 PSI into the shocks the second day I owned the bike...

Or, for all I know, it came with bad/blown out shocks. It is a 14+ year old bike with over 23,000 miles on it when I got it, after all.
Sounds like to me that the bike rides rough from too much air it the shock for what you are used to. Let all the air out and take a ride see if it feel better. I weigh 120 lbs and run zero air.

Another way to air up the shocks is to get an air tank with a gauge and air it up to 20 psi then fill the shock to where the air equallized in the tank and shock.
 
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