Kawasaki VN750 Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,527 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I got my 2002 the license plate bulb didn't work. I noticed the housing was a little deformed, so I finally got around to fixing it today with a new housing I had and I found out why it melted. The PO used a 12v 23w bulb and it should have been only 8 watts. So use the proper bulbs.

 

·
2000 VN 750 Senior Member
Joined
·
2,501 Posts
Agreed but it looks cool when the little flames are coming off the back as you are riding. lol I would suggest looking at all the other lenses to see if there is any deformation or discoloration before you have to buy more.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
The oem bulb is always on and draws about .66 amps. I use a 1156 LED bulb for the license plate bulb and draw .03 amps. Every amp you can save on our bikes is worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,051 Posts
i am pretty sure the original owner was not trying to over illuminate his license plate, i bet he went to an auto store, showed them the bulb, the idiot behind the counter said, oh we got that, and gave him the wrong bulb. I have no faith in anybody any more.

But thanks for the post, it just goes to show you what 3x the wattage will do!

kenny
 

·
2000 VN 750 Senior Member
Joined
·
2,501 Posts
I still like the small flames coming out when it over heats and the lens begins to burn. (lol) Not sure if the original owner would not have gone into Wallyworld and just picked up the first bulb that looked to be the right size and socket tab configuration. If you are unwilling to check the numbers on the replacement you usually also go for the cheap stuff. At least it is fixed now without too much of a problem and he had a new housing and lens already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
The oem bulb is always on and draws about .66 amps. I use a 1156 LED bulb for the license plate bulb and draw .03 amps. Every amp you can save on our bikes is worth it.
You may be correct, but I am not sure I understand. As I understand it the alternator stator puts out maximum output all the time, and the regulator holds the voltage at ~13.5 Volts DC The excess is shunted to ground by the regulator and produces heat.
One could argue that every bit of power you save is going into work for the regulator and that the best scenario would be to load the system such that the stator was running at just below the maximum needed to hold regulated output thus minimising the power to be dissipated by the regulator. To put it another way, the stator is producing full power all the time and that power is shared by dissipation due to the regulator and consumption by the electrical system. As long as you do not draw more than the regulator is dissipating to regulate, if you try to draw more then you may increase the load on the stator. I think, but I may be wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
Thanks for the confirmation. My '95 VN700 would appear to still be running on the original reg/rec. Fingers crossed, although I have quite a number of them that I got for £5-00 each when I was building the Norton. Do the MOSFET ones still shunt the excess to ground and is the reliability due to their inherent robustness in terms of transients and heat ?
 

·
Sparky!!!
Joined
·
8,697 Posts
Yes MOSFET R/Rs still shunt to ground, but they do it more efficiently. The MOFSET Bridges are designed to handle both low amp draw and high amp draw better than the standard shunt type R/R. The biggest advantage is they produce a full 14.5 volts through the whole RPM range delivering full amperage when the system needs it most like at a traffic light in a hot day when the cooling fan is kicked on and brake light is activated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,027 Posts
My bike no longer has a license plate light, or bracket. I removed the whole thing and bolted the plate directly to the holes left in the rear fender left by removing all the bracketry. Looks much cleaner that way.

I have always used the oem bulbs in everything. I have never ever replaced an oem incandescent bulb with an LED. The reason? I just don't like LEDs. And they will not save enough power to make any difference. The tail light and front running lights are the only lights that stay on all the time. The headlight cannot be replaced by an LED, and it is what uses most of the power. The turn signals and brakelight are hardly ever on.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top