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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi! Newbie here. I just did a 2600 mile trip on my 93 Vulcan 750: Boston to Nova Scotia and back!

There were a couple of minor snags during the trip. Once after an extended ride in rain, the cylinders misfired but eventually the bike fired on all cylinders. I didn't do anything special. Just rode her at low speed for a couple of miles. The second issue was the speedometer cable coming undone near the wheel after a long ride on some rough roads between Canso and Sheet Harbour in NS. That was a simple enough fix.

The stock seat was a killer after about 90 miles or so. Other than that, the 17 year old Vulcan performed superbly in our trip!! Plenty of power available even at top speeds. And very solid too!

A little background:

I bought the bike used in 2003. Back then it felt heavy and awkward. The engine also often stalled at idle. Plus I couldn't always get it to start...kept flooding the engine. So after putting about a 100 miles, I put the bike in storage and didn't take it out until 2 months ago. This time the bike was much easier to handle since I have put on about 30 Lbs.

Trip preparation:

I took it to a mechanic referred to my buddy. The mechanic cleaned out the fuel tank, took care of the carbs and showed me the proper way to start the bike (the Clymer manual is awesome and shows you how to properly start the bike as well). I rode her for about 150 miles and still had the engine stalling and hot start issues. So the mechanic relocated the rectifier/regulator, as recommended in the awesome VN750 forums, and said that there was nothing else wrong with the bike. And he was right.

See, I was riding the bike like I drove my car. With my Nissan Maxima, I would go to top gear as soon as I was on level ground and even though I might be doing only 30 miles an hour. My mechanic told me that the bike is a high RPM machine and I can't use it like I do my car. He said I should be maintaining between 4000 and 5000 RPMs once I get out of 1st gear and that I could ride at 40 miles an hour in only 2nd or 3rd gear. Once I started doing like he said, not only did the bike handle and respond really crisply but the engine stopped dying at idle as well.

As for the hot start issue, my mechanic told me that since its an old bike, I can't expect to just press the starter button and have the engine run. He asked me to open the throttle a little bit and then press the starter button. Sure enough. She starts fine every time even in very hot conditions!

Additional equipment:

I got Tourmaster Cruiser II Saddlebags. I didn't have to relocate the direction indicators. The saddlebags did their job.

The Kuryakyn GranCruise tank bag was okay. The main zippers failed after the first two days of use. I used the rain cover on it after to prevent stuff from falling through.

Memphis Shades Hell Cat Windshield: Great value for the money! I am exceptionally pleased with this windshield. So easy to setup, it also caught all the bugs and kept the wind blast out. When visibility was low as during a drizzle, I just sat up a bit straighter -- I am 5'7" -- so that my nose was slightly above the windshield allowing me to see clearly but still not enough to get hit by wind blast. Cleaned it off bugs with two swipes at a couple of gas stations. Sleek and stylish!

Seafoam or B-12:

My mechanic advised that I use Berryman's B-12 instead of Seafoam as the B-12 completely dissolves crud as well as works better with the fuel sold in the New England area. I have not tried running the fuel additive yet. Will post here after trying the B-12 out...
 

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Newb with a Bullet!
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the proper way to start the bike (the Clymer manual is awesome and shows you how to properly start the bike as well).
What is this special/correct/secret way to start the bike? I don't recall hearing of this before! :wow:
 

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Old Twistie Sticks Rider
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Welcome getgopi1, seems like you've got the bull by the horns... Glad your mechanic was able to get things going for you, just hang in here with these good folks and you will be fine...
BTW-2600 mi., now thats a darn good trip on the VN750 especially with the stock seat...
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Old Dog (?):

Thank you!! Yes, I am lucky to have found a mechanic who knows his stuff :)

krebsne:

I am pretty sure that when I first bought the bike, it hadn't been used in a long while. I would just press the starter button and expect the engine to start. I would also run down the battery attempting to start the bike. Plus I remember fiddling with the idle adjustment too often. And whatever I was doing before would eventually flood the engine. Then I would remove the spark plugs from their sockets and pump the fuel out by hitting the starter.

My mechanic said that I should open up the throttle as soon as the engine seemed to turn over. Then rev the engine for a bit. Essentially he asked that I not be timid with the startup process.

The Clymer manual showed a much simpler way to start a flooded engine: Simply keep the Run switch in the off position and attempt to "start" the bike. If I remember right, the manual had a total of six pages dedicated to starting the engine under various conditions: cold starting, flooded engine, etc.

These days the engine starts off fine right away. And I don't even have to rev or anything. I guess it all comes down to riding the bike...and keeping on riding!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have attached one picture my friend took using his cellphone during a ferry crossing near Deer Island...shortly after we left Lubec, Maine behind :)

The rest of the photos are on his camera. I will post a few once he makes them available. We only got back two days ago.

On a side note...mileage:

Before the trip I used up close to about 3 tanks of gas and got about 30 miles to the gallon. At the end of the trip, I was getting about 48 miles to the gallon :smiley_th
 

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Goes to show you that a bike needs to be ridden! What a cool trip. I use the chemtool B12 when I have carbs apart to clean them. It does a nice job on that, but as far as adding to the gas, I have always used Seafoam. It does a good job of cleaning and keeping things clean, along with being a first rate fuel stabilizer to keep your ride ready for you while you leave it sitting for a while. It's just my opinion, but have no fear of using seafoam. Case in point, I've never had the carbs off my 750 in 3+ years and have religiously used seafoam about 3 oz, about every three or four tank fulls of gas.
 

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Ba dum dum, ching...
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What is this special/correct/secret way to start the bike? I don't recall hearing of this before! :wow:
Dance around the bike in a counterclockwise direction while chanting OH-Waa TaGoo Siam. Then sit on the pasenger seat with both feet perched on the engine guard and hit the starter while screaming the lyrics to any ELO song.

At least that's what I do and it seems to work. ;)

R
 

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Dance around the bike in a counterclockwise direction while chanting OH-Waa TaGoo Siam. Then sit on the pasenger seat with both feet perched on the engine guard and hit the starter while screaming the lyrics to any ELO song.

At least that's what I do and it seems to work. ;)

R
Yeah, and your iridium plugs and AGM battery don't hurt either!
 

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Newb with a Bullet!
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Man that's the way I sharpen pencils! Who knew it was so versatile!!

Dance around the bike in a counterclockwise direction while chanting OH-Waa TaGoo Siam. Then sit on the pasenger seat with both feet perched on the engine guard and hit the starter while screaming the lyrics to any ELO song.

At least that's what I do and it seems to work. ;)

R
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Goes to show you that a bike needs to be ridden! What a cool trip. I use the chemtool B12 when I have carbs apart to clean them. It does a nice job on that, but as far as adding to the gas, I have always used Seafoam. It does a good job of cleaning and keeping things clean, along with being a first rate fuel stabilizer to keep your ride ready for you while you leave it sitting for a while. It's just my opinion, but have no fear of using seafoam. Case in point, I've never had the carbs off my 750 in 3+ years and have religiously used seafoam about 3 oz, about every three or four tank fulls of gas.
fergy, my friend who rode with me to Nova Scotia is currently trying out the B-12 on his 1300 CC Honda touring bike. He had some idle issues. I am going to see how it works on his bike and then try either that or Seafoam on my bike. I might use the B-12 initially and then go with Seafoam for ongoing "maintenance"...like you've pointed out.

I rode the bike yesterday in heavy Boston traffic and it did die during idle a couple of times. I noticed that if I ride the bike at highway speeds for a while and then come to an idle, the engine doesn't die. But if I crawl in traffic for a while at low RPMs, which gets the engine hot -- the temp indicator comes to the half-way mark -- then the engine tends to die at idle. Kinda becomes a chore riding the bike when that happens. One driver behind me moved to the next lane. Didn't like that at all :(

Mostly I can only get the bike out during weekends so it might be a while before I post on here as to the effects of using Seafoam/B-12.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here is another picture that I took with my cellphone while camped off the northumberland coast in a place called Seafoam. That evening we polished off a bottle of wine that we had bought earlier during a wine tasting visit to the lovely Jost vineyards.
 

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Love My Baby
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Nice pic. Where did you pack all your gear and your tent?
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Nice pic. Where did you pack all your gear and your tent?
I used a backpacking tent -- the smaller, lime green one in the second picture -- and it, along with a sleeping bag and inflatable pad, went into a stuff sack, which I then tied to the back seat using bungee cords. You might be able to make that out in the first picture. I had got a Kawasaki rear rack prior to the trip but it wouldn't fit correctly...and I seemed to have managed quite well without it.

Wore the same pair of Jeans and Jacket for the entire trip. Packed a bunch of t-shirts, a towel, underwear and socks in the saddlebags along with a couple of books, a first aid kid, toiletry kit and a LED lantern to hang inside the tent. My buddy brought a toolkit.

The tank bag held my phone, AMA roadside assistance paper, insect repellant, a headlamp, maps and such, etc. Kept my wallet and passport in a zip lock bag held in a little bag tied around my waist :smiley_th
 
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