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Hi Everyone

New member here. I have searched and found an engine rebuild video series. Very helpful to what I am about to start. However it starts at the point where the engine is already off the bike. Is there a video or series of videos that shows how to get the engine off from the bike? Please help and thanks in advance.

Max
 

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if the video's you found are Roach's, they are very good. I don't know if he did one about pulling the engine or not, but its not that difficult, just follow the service manual. You do have one right?
 

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im replacing mine Wed, thank God im keeping my 8mo old clutch. looks like it comes off the throttle side after removing the subframe.

also, ive got some brand new head and base gaskets for the front cylinder im selling in Janruary when life slows down enough to ebay them.
 

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Roach's videos are excellent. I don't plan on ever rebuilding my engine, but I downloaded all the videos anyway. He did not have an engine removal video. Most of it is covered in the manuals. I have both the Clymer manual and the Kawasaki manual. I prefer the Clymer.
I just finished removing and reinstalling my engine due to a stator failure. It is not hard, but very time consuming, due to all the other parts you have to remove to get to the engine.

1. Remove the seat
2. Remove the gas tank
3. Remove both side covers.
4. Remove both steering head covers
5. Remove both exhaust heat shields
6. Remove both header pipes and clamps
7. Remove battery
8. Remove coolant overflow tank
9. Drain cooling system
10. Drain oil
11. Remove radiator cover
12. Remove radiator bolts and pull radiator forward. Remove the wires from the radiator and fan
13. Loosen the upper and lower radiator hose clamps at the engine, remove the radiator
14. Loosen the clamps and remove the entire upper coolant assembly, including the filler neck, thermostat housing, and hoses to both the front and rear cylinders. Remove the yellow temp sensor wire
15. Remove the screws from the front coil. let the coil hang by the wires
16. Remove the single screw from the wire harness support bracket next to the coil, leave the bracket in place
17. Disconnect the rear brake light wire, remove the right footpeg/brake assembly.
18. Remove both air filter housings
19. Remove both the ducts that go from the surge tank to the air filter housings
20. Remove the drain hose from the right front of the surge tank
21. Remove the crankcase vent hose from both the engine and the surge tank
22. Remove the green neutral indicator wire on the bottom of the engine
23. Remove the ground wire from the engine
24. Remove both rubber elbows between the carbs and surge tank. Remove the throttle cables and enrichener cable from the carbs
25. If you still have it, remove the 3 way valve from under the seat, the hose to the front cylinder, the hose to the rear cylinder, the vacuum line to the rear carb, and the hose from the surge tank. I through all this stuff away years ago
26. Remove the front exhaust manifold
27. The surge tank will now be loose. Wrap something under it at both ends and secure it to something overhead to get it up and out of the way. This is why the front coil and bracket needed to be loosened
28. Put something solid under the engine to support it. I understand a standard cinder block is about a perfect fit. Put a magazine or something between it and the engine to prevent damage to to the bottom of the engine. I used a paint bucket to initially remove the engine, then moved it to a homemade dolly with casters
29. Remove all 3 engine mount nuts and bolts
30. Remove the bolts from the right muffler and crossover chamber. Put a scissors jack under it to support it, and lower it slightly so you can reach and remove the 2 lower Allen bolts on the removeable section. Raise the exhaust back up and put the bolts in hand tight for now
Remove the 2 upper Allen bolts, and remove the right frame section.
31. Despite what the manuals say, you can leave the front bevel gearcase in place. You will need to remove the clutch cable from the engine. Just remove the 10mm bolt and slide the whole fitting off the shaft. Then remove the cable from the fitting and slide it through the retainer bracket. Also remove the shifter.
32. Go over everything one last time, make sure there is nothing else connected to the engine that needs to come off. Remove the swing arm boot from the engine side.
33. Slowly start sliding the engine forward and to the right at the same time. The output shaft will disengage from the U-joint, and there should be plenty of room between the engine and the surge tank. The one thing you really need to watch out for is the shifter shaft. With the bevel gearcase in place it is a tight fit, but it does fit with over 1/4" to spare. Don't bang the shifter shaft on the frame. It is very fragile, and easy to break inside the engine. This is also the main thing to watch when reinstalling the engine.


There are a LOT of nuts, bolts, spacers, clamps, and other small parts. I put them all in ziplock bags and labeled them. I had a pretty good size box full of bagged parts. You will also need a place to put the big parts so they don't get damaged. Pulling the engine took me about 5 hours. Replacing the stator and balancer dampers and putting it all back together took about 35 hours. I did a lot of cleaning and some other not completely necessary things. I also wrote down everything I did when I took it apart, and the order in which I did it. I went over that list when I put it back, double checking everything. Yes it can be done a lot faster. But I was in no hurry, and the last thing I wanted to happen was to get it all back together, then realize I forgot something and have to pull the engine again. I learned that the hard way many years ago. I spent a month building a VW engine ('72 Bug) getting everything just right. I had it all together and was about to put it back in the car, when I realized I had left a small but very necessary part out, that required a total engine teardown and another rebuild to fix. It was my first VW engine rebuild, and I was not familiar with it. This job was the same way. First time I ever did it. And the last.

I never did find out how long it took Roach to rebuild that engine, but he didn't seem to be in a hurry.
 

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3. Remove both side covers.
Why the right side cover? Definitely didn't remove mine.

5. Remove both exhaust heat shields
6. Remove both header pipes and clamps
To drop the exhaust, you can just unbolt the front header and loosen the clamp to separate it from the h box and remove. Then unbolt the back header and the two bolts on each side holding the mufflers to the frame. At that point the rest of the exhaust can be dropped down and removed from the left side as a unit. No need to touch any of the heat shielding.

14. Loosen the clamps and remove the entire upper coolant assembly, including the filler neck, thermostat housing, and hoses to both the front and rear cylinders. Remove the yellow temp sensor wire
None of this needs to come out. Just disconnect the cooling hoses from the motor.

16. Remove the single screw from the wire harness support bracket next to the coil, leave the bracket in place
18. Remove both air filter housings
19. Remove both the ducts that go from the surge tank to the air filter housings
20. Remove the drain hose from the right front of the surge tank
21. Remove the crankcase vent hose from both the engine and the surge tank
24. Remove both rubber elbows between the carbs and surge tank. Remove the throttle cables and enrichener cable from the carbs
25. If you still have it, remove the 3 way valve from under the seat, the hose to the front cylinder, the hose to the rear cylinder, the vacuum line to the rear carb, and the hose from the surge tank. I through all this stuff away years ago
27. The surge tank will now be loose. Wrap something under it at both ends and secure it to something overhead to get it up and out of the way. This is why the front coil and bracket needed to be loosened
All of this can be omitted if you're ear shaved and coastered.

28. Put something solid under the engine to support it. I understand a standard cinder block is about a perfect fit. Put a magazine or something between it and the engine to prevent damage to to the bottom of the engine. I used a paint bucket to initially remove the engine, then moved it to a homemade dolly with casters
29. Remove all 3 engine mount nuts and bolts
For what it's worth, a Harbor Freight transmission jack was perfect for removing the engine. Just roll it under and take the weight off the mounts, then unbolt everything and slowly lower/steer the engine out, then roll it away.

30. Remove the bolts from the right muffler and crossover chamber. Put a scissors jack under it to support it, and lower it slightly so you can reach and remove the 2 lower Allen bolts on the removeable section. Raise the exhaust back up and put the bolts in hand tight for now
Based on the adjustments I suggested above, this can be omitted as well (because you already took five minutes to remove the entire exhaust system).

There are a LOT of nuts, bolts, spacers, clamps, and other small parts. I put them all in ziplock bags and labeled them. I had a pretty good size box full of bagged parts. You will also need a place to put the big parts so they don't get damaged.
Simply putting pieces back where they came from as you remove parts will eliminate the need for this, and be far more intuitively obvious on reassembly.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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X2 on the above
 

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1. I took the side covers off to avoid damaging them while working on the bike. It only takes a minute to remove them.

2. The steering head covers also only take a minute to remove, and have to be removed to remove all the cooling system parts on the right, and remove the bolts from the front coil and wiring harness bracket. Removing these parts are necessary to be able to lift the surge tank up and out of the way while removing and reinstalling the engine.

3. I have effectively "coastered" my bike, with rubber caps, but still have the "ears" and complete intake system. I considered using the UNI filters, but decided against it when I realized how easy it was to remove and reinstall the stock system doing it my way, the fact that you have to raise the rear of the tank to make them fit (then the seat doesn't fit well. I tried it. It can be forced on, but I like things to fit well) and having oiled filters right about where my knees go. I already have too many pair of oily jeans. And what is a Vulcan without it's ears?

4. I have posted before that I thought a transmission jack would work well for removing the engine. And I would have used one if I had one, but mine was "borrowed" years ago and never returned. Glad it worked for you.

5. As far as dropping the whole exhaust in one piece, it can be done that way. I've done it. You will likely need help to put it back though, as it is heavy, and trying to hold it in place while you line up the bolt holes is not easy. And there is no really good surface under the crossover chamber to put a jack. As I said, I have done it that way, and had to fight with it to get it back together. This time I decided to do it the easy way and avoid messing with the heavy stuff. The heat shields come right off. I had replaced the retainer bolts with Allen head bolts. Less than 5 minutes to remove them.

6. Putting fasteners back where they came from definitely works, and I do it all the time. But having done it both ways, I don't see a clear advantage to either. There is often more than one good way to do something. As for parts storage, that came in handy. I got the engine out just about the time riding season started, I have other bikes, and wanted to spend out short riding season on the road, not wrenching. And I have an air conditioned work area, so I was able to comfortably work on the Vulcan when it was 115 outside. So the job wound up taking a bit longer than normal. Several months longer.

When I made my living as a professional mechanic in a fleet services dept., I was always frustrated because I had to "hurry up and get it done" to move on to the next job. Since they were govt. vehicles, nobody cared if you scratched them, rounded off bolts, and left greasy fingerprints all over the place. Time was all that mattered as long as it worked, and you didn't use any more parts than absolutely necessary. Took all the fun out of it.

Working on vehicles is my main hobby. And I can work on my own bikes and cars my way, and enjoy it, without having to be in any kind of hurry. I wanted this to be an enjoyable experience, not just get it back together as quickly as possible. And for the most part this was. My only real concern was whether the stator was going to work. So far it does. I tend to be very methodical and detail oriented, and doing a job that way can be very satisfying.
 

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Well, I dunno, my seat fits fine and my knees don't touch the air filters, so my jeans stay clean. Shouldn't be that oily, the bike won't run right with excess oil on the filters (stock or pods).

In my opinion the Vulcan is better looking without the ears, it's cleaner visually, easier to clean and maintain, also the increased airflow over the heads should let it run cooler. The intake air has to be cooler with a shave, versus preheating the air in the airbox.
 

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Yep. You shouldn't get a hint of oil off the filters and onto your clothes. I can't speak to the UNI filters, but my K&N's didn't require any adjustment to seat or tank to fit perfectly.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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I needed to space the back of the tank a little
 

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Jerry, I'll give you credit on one thing - the steering head covers do come off quickly (and should). I was thinking of something else earlier. Everything else seems like you're taking the long way around, then claiming to be doing it simply because you're not in a rush.
 

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Shouldn't be different in that way. I'd love to get a closer picture of each of ours side by side to see what's causing the difference. Mine doesn't clear by a lot, but it's plenty.
 

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Shouldn't be different in that way. I'd love to get a closer picture of each of ours side by side to see what's causing the difference. Mine doesn't clear by a lot, but it's plenty.
Could be they redesigned the filter, companies love downsizing products these days. Save 30 cents on each piece and you get to keep your CEO position.
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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Which k&n model?I think mine was either 2360 or 2630 don't remember. Depends on the length of the filter
 

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FREEBIRDS MC CENTRAL NY
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Reread the verses.2340
 

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I'll take some pics
 

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Mine will take a while since the engine is out, but I'll post when I can.
 
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