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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This just came in the mail from ebay:


http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320456770654
I installed one in the rear blinker and was very impressed with the brightness, quality, and quick service from the seller. Fit right in, no mods required.

It has my VN750 approval to recommend to you all..

DT
 

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:worthless
I would love to see how this worked out. what colour, I musta missed it in the ebay listin
 

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DT, I'm assuming that with all the LEDs, there's enough resistance so that the turn signal unit recognizes there's "a working bulb" in there and so functions properly? That's always a problem with just replacing the bulb with an LED cluster.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
:worthless
I would love to see how this worked out. what colour, I musta missed it in the ebay listin
WHITE. But know led white has more blue in it than a filament bulb.

DT, I'm assuming that with all the LEDs, there's enough resistance so that the turn signal unit recognizes there's "a working bulb" in there and so functions properly? That's always a problem with just replacing the bulb with an LED cluster.
It did increase the flash speed, but not to the point of hyper flashing as some call it. I'm going to order a couple more.
 

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DT, I'm assuming that with all the LEDs, there's enough resistance so that the turn signal unit recognizes there's "a working bulb" in there and so functions properly? That's always a problem with just replacing the bulb with an LED cluster.
The opposite it true. LEDs do not draw enough current to satisfy most thermal based flasher units, which use bulb current draw to determine blink rate (no current = fast blink). In the early days of LEDs folks would add all kinds of resistors to the circuit to compensate, but defeats the purpose of using LEDs (low power consumption) in the first place.

Bottom line: the stock thermal flasher has to be replaced with a no-load electronic version (about $12+) for LED blinkers (and normal blink rate) or live with the faster "bulb out" blink rate (NOTE: DOT blink rate standards are 60-120/minute. I'm not sure if the "bulb out" blink rate is faster than 120/minute, but it is annoyingly fast).
 

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this is pretty cool except for the shipping ;)
what if we (whomever wants some) order a 'bulk' the seller, we might get a good discount on the shipping. I believe lots of us would want to order a set.
just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bottom line: the stock thermal flasher has to be replaced with a no-load electronic version (about $12+) for LED blinkers (and normal blink rate) or live with the faster "bulb out" blink rate.
My front blinkers -1157 bulbs- are stock so I'm not getting the 'bulb out' blink rate. I'm going to order some 1157 LEDs to test w/electronic flasher in the future.

There is one drawback to any LED board: side visibility is reduced compared to filament bulbs. Our amber lenses are not designed for LED's directional lighting. I'm installing side LED blinkers (nothing more than an amber LED running light) on my bags to assist in visibility.
 

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How does visibility from the side compare to a regular tungsten filament bulb? All the LEDs face to the rear, none to the side. This may be a moot point on a turn signal indcator bulb. It is something to consider though, if you are contemplating changing out your tail/brake light 1157 bulbs for LEDs.

I picked up some no name, red 1157 LED surplus replacement bulbs from Princess Auto, with 6 rear facing and 6 outer circumference facing LEDs, for $3 CAN, apiece. I have not ridden with them yet, so I cannot comment on their durability. I changed out one brake light on my bike to compare with a regular bulb. From 20 or 30 feet away the LED is considerably brighter and redder, both to the side and rear. The filament bulb looks positively orange through the taillight lens by comparison.

EDIT: LOL. DT beat me with the answer to my side visibility question, before I got it posted.

I`m not sure I agree with cglennon, that a burned out signal, or a lower current drawing LED causes the remaining bulb to blink faster. I haven`t burned out a signal light in my automobiles for quite a while, but I seem to remember the remaining bulb blinking slower, because the bi-metal arm in the signal-stat takes longer to warm up and bend away from the contact point. I do remember that when we hooked up a trailer to the car and added a third signal lamp to a 2 bulb flasher circuit, the signals would then flash faster. That`s the way I recall it.
 

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The opposite it true. LEDs do not draw enough current to satisfy most thermal based flasher units, which use bulb current draw to determine blink rate (no current = fast blink). In the early days of LEDs folks would add all kinds of resistors to the circuit to compensate, but defeats the purpose of using LEDs (low power consumption) in the first place.

I may have said that wrong, but it's what I meant- that when we replace our regular bulbs with LEDs, the unit thinks the "standard bulb" has burned out (no current). The LEDS are a reduced draw, which is great for the bike since it has limited extra capacity - but if the unit thinks the bulbs are kaput, then that's not good. And if you have to add the resistor to the circuit to keep the unit in line, it defeats the purpose of the LED replacements.
 

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DT, I'm assuming that with all the LEDs, there's enough resistance so that the turn signal unit recognizes there's "a working bulb" in there and so functions properly? That's always a problem with just replacing the bulb with an LED cluster.
The opposite it true. LEDs do not draw enough current to satisfy most thermal based flasher units, which use bulb current draw to determine blink rate (no current = fast blink). In the early days of LEDs folks would add all kinds of resistors to the circuit to compensate, but defeats the purpose of using LEDs (low power consumption) in the first place.

I may have said that wrong, but it's what I meant- that when we replace our regular bulbs with LEDs, the unit thinks the "standard bulb" has burned out (no current). The LEDS are a reduced draw, which is great for the bike since it has limited extra capacity - but if the unit thinks the bulbs are kaput, then that's not good. And if you have to add the resistor to the circuit to keep the unit in line, it defeats the purpose of the LED replacements.
You said it right Cindy. At least it reads perfectly clearly to me, and confirms the post that I made only seconds before you did.:smiley_th
 

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check the other items

I just got back from the link and they other several other styles of lights both 1157 and 1156 socket styles. They are multi LED and multi directional also. I don't know how they will flash, but I am going to buy them and try them out. They are offered as auctions, price plus shipping and shipping included. Check it out.
 

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I just ordered a pair of them for $1.29 plus $8.33 S&H. I saw a red one, earlier on ebay, but could not find a pair of them. I will put them in the rear turn signals, and when somebody is tailgating me I will put them on flash. Fast is good.
Thanks, dirtrack.
 

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Discussion Starter #17

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I installed some unidirectional LED brake bulbs (think they had 12 rear facing LEDs) and they are much brighter than stock. They also flash when the brakes are applied. Been in the bike for about 10 months and 6,000 miles.
 
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