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  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-27-2009 05:36 PM
bigrepp61 dirt track - yeah i forgot that step... thanks for pointing that out....

and liberty pilot.... yeah you can use an electric or pnumatic sander but once you take the majority off you will want to go by hand because you cant get the same contours... either use a sanding sponge.... (looks like a long brick that is very flexible) or if you cant find one or dont have one just ise a normal dish sponge with the paper around it.. that way you dont sand more where your fingers are pressing.. again like said earlier... $800 for someone to do it bus alot of supplies to do it yourself and then you know how to do it afterwards...
04-27-2009 05:02 PM
FlaRider
Quote:
Originally Posted by jthill524 View Post
My Uncle was a Body and Fender man for 40years. He showed me a little trick to remove the Original Paint if your doing a repair job. Now this only works on the Metal surfaces. Take a little Propane Torch and Heat/burn the paint on the spot you need to sand down. Then take a wire-wheel to it. It takes it off down to the metal.
Just don't over heat the metal.
Hey JT --

Hmm, that's an interesting idea! I never thought about using heat to remove paint.

I recently painted my front fender and used spray-on paint remover from Advance Auto to remove the paint. Spray it on, wait about 20 minutes and wipe it off with a wet rag. I was surprised at how well it worked!!
04-27-2009 02:00 PM
jthill524 My Uncle was a Body and Fender man for 40years. He showed me a little trick to remove the Original Paint if your doing a repair job. Now this only works on the Metal surfaces. Take a little Propane Torch and Heat/burn the paint on the spot you need to sand down. Then take a wire-wheel to it. It takes it off down to the metal.
Just don't over heat the metal.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiron View Post
The sanding the original decals and paint down took forever, even with 320 grit sandpaper.

One recommendation though...Go to the junkyard and pay like $20 for an older car fender that's a decent size to practice on. The older cars have more surface area and the fenders have all the areas to practice on. e.g. Flat, curved, tight edges, etc. It's one thing I didn't do that I should have. The practice would have saved me a lot of time and effort on my tank.
04-27-2009 08:57 AM
LibertyPilot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiron View Post
One recommendation though...Go to the junkyard and pay like $20 for an older car fender that's a decent size to practice on. The older cars have more surface area and the fenders have all the areas to practice on. e.g. Flat, curved, tight edges, etc. It's one thing I didn't do that I should have. The practice would have saved me a lot of time and effort on my tank.
I have been waiting to do my own paint job on the bike. I actually have some artistic ability and would love to put it to the bike. This is a GREAT idea! One question: with all the sanding that's needed, does anyone know if power sanders work with this type of project? I don't want to cut corners but if I can save some momo down-time I will...
04-27-2009 02:49 AM
lance328
Quote:
Originally Posted by OlHossCanada View Post
I`ve got a question for the experienced painters here. I believe that factory paint jobs are baked in an oven, which gives them extra hardness and durability. Could an individual improvise an oven for a bike with some plywood and a couple of heat lamps? Also, would it be worth the time and effort?
You would have to keep the temperature around 170 for a couple hours and have a circulation fan to evenly distribute the heat and a fan to exhaust the fumes to prevent solvent popping.
04-27-2009 02:25 AM
OlHossCanada I`ve got a question for the experienced painters here. I believe that factory paint jobs are baked in an oven, which gives them extra hardness and durability. Could an individual improvise an oven for a bike with some plywood and a couple of heat lamps? Also, would it be worth the time and effort?
04-27-2009 01:48 AM
dirtrack650
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigrepp61 View Post
since your doing gloss black make sure you do a good job with the prep work... any imperfections are going to show whit the black.... so sand.... body filer... sand..... body filler.... sand..... body filer and sand untill everything is smooth to the touch.
When you say body filler, do you mean glazing putty for the final steps?

DT
04-26-2009 03:28 PM
bigrepp61 since your doing gloss black make sure you do a good job with the prep work... any imperfections are going to show whit the black.... so sand.... body filer... sand..... body filler.... sand..... body filer and sand untill everything is smooth to the touch.... your hand will show more imperfections that your eyes will pick up.... then spray the paint o the specs of the manufacture...(paint+reducer) spray.... let it flash... spray again... let flash.... and go until it is smooth and uniformly covered... if you do get a drip or a ripple dont worry too much.... you can take a razor blade when its dry and at a 90 degree angle you can srape off the paint on the run or sag little by little.... then hit the area with a light coat of black and your ready for clear.. clear coat it.... sand and buff....
04-26-2009 01:43 PM
Jace Bror Oh you got it easy. plus with gloss it will be easier to get a good clear coat that will protect it from gas drips.
As far as the frame rust, yeah sand it down and prime with the self-etching primer, and paint.
04-26-2009 12:48 PM
kanuck69 Just A thought, you could jet the "bat" simble from a sign shop as well. Then you can remove it and still have your nice paint job. If you wanted to.
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