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Thread: Rear Brakes siezed after wintering the bike Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-07-2009 10:51 AM
niterider
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgchimp View Post
Thought you might like an update on my progress, however if you think that i am going over the top regarding postings on this subject someone please say so and i'll call it a day.

Stripped the shoes off and undid the lever and pulled the cam from the housing Not before marking everything with TIPPEX IE the lever position in relation to the drum, the lever position in relation to the cam,

Anyway the cam where it goes through the drum was rusted good and proper, so after half hour with the emery cloth cleaning off the cam and the housing there is not a trace of rust to be seen

The part which i was dreading was re assembling the shoes on the cam, but this was by far the easiest thing so far as i just followed the manuals advise and put the springs on the shoes then formed a V with the shoes then easing them slowly eased them over the cams into position, All in all about 2 minutes to perform that task

Put the re assembled drum back into the wheel , worked the lever and its operating brilliantly i am well pleased.

Will put it all back together tomorrow but i need advise again on the following,

A) Do you grease the axle shaft and spacers Not needed

B) Do you put grease inside the wheel bearings which appear to be sealed no grease

C) Do you put grease on the cog on the back of the wheel where it meshes with the diff a little bit, don't get messy

Thanks again
If you need help keep asking
01-07-2009 09:23 AM
pgchimp Thought you might like an update on my progress, however if you think that i am going over the top regarding postings on this subject someone please say so and i'll call it a day.

Stripped the shoes off and undid the lever and pulled the cam from the housing Not before marking everything with TIPPEX IE the lever position in relation to the drum, the lever position in relation to the cam,

Anyway the cam where it goes through the drum was rusted good and proper, so after half hour with the emery cloth cleaning off the cam and the housing there is not a trace of rust to be seen

The part which i was dreading was re assembling the shoes on the cam, but this was by far the easiest thing so far as i just followed the manuals advise and put the springs on the shoes then formed a V with the shoes then easing them slowly eased them over the cams into position, All in all about 2 minutes to perform that task

Put the re assembled drum back into the wheel , worked the lever and its operating brilliantly i am well pleased.

Will put it all back together tomorrow but i need advise again on the following,

A) Do you grease the axle shaft and spacers

B) Do you put grease inside the wheel bearings which appear to be sealed

C) Do you put grease on the cog on the back of the wheel where it meshes with the diff

Thanks again
01-07-2009 01:52 AM
niterider
Quote:
Originally Posted by OlHossCanada View Post
What happened to the post that I made here at noon?? I should have read to the end of the thread before making an edit to a previous post, because you have already found what I suspected with the stiff turning brake cam. Glad to hear that no major parts are needed, just a little time and maintenance.

As long as the brake pads are not contaminated with any grease, I agree with nr, scuff `em up a bit and reinstall.

A couple of more things I thought of to check while the rear wheel is off;

1. Check that both rear wheel bearings inner race turns freely and smoothly.

2. Check the swingarm/driveshaft pivot bearings and pivot shafts for looseness or adjustment needed by alternately pushing it to the left and right. Your Haynes manual should have any other info you need to do this.

I knew you would do just fine with this once you got started. Now you`re on the way to being an experienced wrench yourself, ( or should I say spanner in your case?)

You will have to find someone else to help with posting pics, I don`t know how yet, myself.
I up load to photobucket and then use the img link or the url. The img link gives a picture, the url gives a link to a picture.
01-06-2009 07:17 PM
OlHossCanada What happened to the post that I made here at noon?? I should have read to the end of the thread before making an edit to a previous post, because you have already found what I suspected with the stiff turning brake cam. Glad to hear that no major parts are needed, just a little time and maintenance.

As long as the brake pads are not contaminated with any grease, I agree with nr, scuff `em up a bit and reinstall.

A couple of more things I thought of to check while the rear wheel is off;

1. Check that both rear wheel bearings inner race turns freely and smoothly.

2. Check the swingarm/driveshaft pivot bearings and pivot shafts for looseness or adjustment needed by alternately pushing it to the left and right. Your Haynes manual should have any other info you need to do this.

I knew you would do just fine with this once you got started. Now you`re on the way to being an experienced wrench yourself, ( or should I say spanner in your case?)

You will have to find someone else to help with posting pics, I don`t know how yet, myself.
01-06-2009 03:27 PM
niterider Use a medium fine sand paper to scuff the shoes a little bit. clean the drum and once you free up the lever you should be okay.
01-06-2009 02:37 PM
pgchimp Firstly let me say before i comment on the stripdown that anyone scared of the spanners............... DONT BE.................... There is no one with more intrepidation than me at wrenching but after following this thread plus the other one on the brake strip i tackled the job today with the following results.

After plying the nuts with releasing agent yesterday i got to work with the spanners today, the only prob i had was getting the right hand lower shock mount past the muffler to remove the axel nut,

Won in the end as i used a piece of wood to wiggle the muffler. everything else went as per the printouts now for the results.

can only move the brake lever with great difficulty hence reason for the strip.
on removing the shoes from the drum it looks like it is just the operating lever so i have soaked it in penetrating oil and will possibly strip it out tomorrow.

What suprises me is the everywhere is greased , levers, shoe tips, posts, bearings, gears, diff spline everything looks very healthy, i am well pleased.

As there is a distinct lack of brake dust in the drum it looks as if the drums have not been operating properly.

I cannot rearly afford to replace the shoes as they are unmarked and near new with a lining thickness of 5.1mm

I have looked in the haynes manual for the lining thickness but it only lists the vulcan 800 rear drum brake lining thickness of 4.9 to 5.5mm with a minimum thickness of 2.6mm the vulcan 750 is unspecified

Any ideas on the thickness of the 750????? must be close to that of the 800!!
i would of thought.

Any further advice would be appreciated now i know what caused the brakes not to work

how do i post pics to go with this thread

Regards
01-05-2009 09:12 AM
hyperbuzzin
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgchimp View Post
I have just the one final question before i do the job, how much HMP Grease do i need to buy will a 100 gram tube suffice or do i need a tin of the stuff
I only used a couple spoonfulls or so, so 100 grams will be plenty.
HMP (high melting point) grease should be OK to use, just make sure it has Molybdenum in it.
The grease we suggest (Honda Moly 60 < link to online supplier) has 60% Molybdenum, which is more than most others offer. It is a 85 gram (3 oz) tube.
I would think you could get that on your side of the pond?
01-05-2009 08:09 AM
pgchimp Thanks for the replys especially yours OlHoss, the more i read the more confident i get, and you are right i am at the very edge of my comfort zone and operating as a "One man band"

I have no one i can fall back on with a spanner background if i come unstuck could say i am a "Billy No mates" as far as spannering is concerned.

Went out today and bought the Torque Wrench, checked the sockets and spanners and i have all the necessary ones to do the job, even the 27mm one, dont know where that came from.

However it snowed overnight heavily and as i do not have the comfort of a garage i am not prepared to freeze doing the job, so for now i am spraying all the nuts etc with releasing agent in preperation for the big day

I have just the one final question before i do the job, how much HMP Grease do i need to buy will a 100 gram tube suffice or do i need a tin of the stuff

Thanks again will be back in touch
01-04-2009 07:00 PM
OlHossCanada I think you`ve gotten some good practical pointers from others who have actually pulled the rear wheel. Mine is based on reading the manual, posts here, pictures provided and my own general experience in DIY on my autos, etc., but not so much on bikes. Every project I tackle usually has some unforseen problem, such as your muffler clamp bolt that is rusted to the point that it will probably break, if you try to remove it. Even if you do not have to remove it for this maintenance, you will likely need to remove it at some time. In your place I would spray some penetrating oil on it, and let it sit for minutes?...hours?...or days?...while working on something else, and every once in a while,try a wrench on it and if it still doesn`t move, spray a little more. Try a couple of good taps with a punch and hammer on the screw or bolt head, or some heat from a propane torch if the oil doesn`t work. If I`m going to break it, let it be when I have time to fix it, not when I want to be riding. When you eventually put the exhaust back together, use some anti-seize lube on the threads to prevent or minimize at least the reoccurance of the problem, for the next time. I`m sure the Haynes manual has a section where it outlines what shop supplies you will need if you are going to do any amount of maintenance and repairs yourself. Sorry if I`m getting too basic here, but you give the impression that this is at the edge of your comfort zone, mechanically speaking. It won`t take long before you will have accumulated the tools and supplies that you use regularly, and will often be able to improvise something you need.

It sounds like you have started to take a look at least, good luck and keep us posted as to what you find.
01-04-2009 10:18 AM
750Doug Oh and one more thing...the rear drum brake on these bikes isn't all that powerful or confident when all the parts are new and everything is working correctly.
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