Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums - Reply to Topic
VN750 General Discussion

Thread: New Tire Scrub in--?? Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

Once registered, your User Name"cannot be changed". We can make exceptions within 7 days, but after that, it is set in stone.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-17-2011 08:25 PM
DavesVulster Yes I agree OD. It's obvious that something goes on with new donuts with regard to traction. The mishaps don't lie. Good point about checking beading on a new tire Ceal, although we might see the same thing because what Knifemaker said makes sense too. I think we should bust into a stealership and spray down some new skins and see what happens... you know, in the name of research and all that...
09-17-2011 08:14 PM
Old Dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceal View Post
It'd be cool to see a similar pic with a brand new tire... just to see if the water beads on the contact patch and compare.
Sure would, and if I had one I would give it a shot of water to see what it looked like... Whatever, I think it's still a good idea to scrub a tire in a bit anyway, why not it's fun too...lol...
PS-On a second look, there is still a bit of beading on the chicken strip...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
09-17-2011 07:43 PM
Ceal It'd be cool to see a similar pic with a brand new tire... just to see if the water beads on the contact patch and compare.
09-17-2011 06:35 PM
Old Dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knifemaker View Post
The reason the water looks different on the sidewalls is because the rubber has a different "finish" there. The side of the tire never touches the road, but still gets water, mud, dirt, etc....on them.

The non tread areas of the tire are thus made with a more "polished" finish, to specifically shed water and dirt more easily. This also includes the bead, so it seals better.

And to make this even more obvious ... Many dealers Armor All the sidewalls to make them shine... A layer of silicone would bead water like that too.

So sorry, your photo proves nothing other than you are observant...
I think it kinda proves that you do need to scrub a new tire in if nothin else... Oh, and that I didn't lie, I did wash my bike, or at least wet things down...lol...
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavesVulster
I think (only my guess really - could be way off...as rare as that is lol) that the process of molding rubber, naturally causes the tire surface that contacts the mold to seal over and become "wax-like" then when you ride on it the chaffing exposes the untouched rubber. If you look at tread in each tire, the only areas that don't bead are where they've had road contact. Just my thoughts but I do agree about misinformation and lawyer talk being a good possibility also. Peace.
I kinda tend to agree on that Dave...

Have a good one...Old Dog...
09-17-2011 02:41 PM
DavesVulster I think (only my guess really - could be way off...as rare as that is lol) that the process of molding rubber, naturally causes the tire surface that contacts the mold to seal over and become "wax-like" then when you ride on it the chaffing exposes the untouched rubber. If you look at tread in each tire, the only areas that don't bead are where they've had road contact. Just my thoughts but I do agree about misinformation and lawyer talk being a good possibility also. Peace.
09-17-2011 02:34 PM
Knifemaker The reason the water looks different on the sidewalls is because the rubber has a different "finish" there. The side of the tire never touches the road, but still gets water, mud, dirt, etc....on them.

The non tread areas of the tire are thus made with a more "polished" finish, to specifically shed water and dirt more easily. This also includes the bead, so it seals better.

And to make this even more obvious ... Many dealers Armor All the sidewalls to make them shine... A layer of silicone would bead water like that too.

So sorry, your photo proves nothing other than you are observant...
09-17-2011 01:41 PM
Ceal interesting!
09-17-2011 12:56 PM
Old Dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knifemaker View Post
Cycle World was asked this a while back and was told by four different tire makers- Michlein, Perrelli,Dunlop and Brridgestone that they do not use any "release agent" on their molds.
A very rare occasion has occured, I gave my bike its annual wash...lol...
Anyway, I noticed on my near new tires that the sidewalls bead up and the tread area does not... That makes me wonder if that might be lawyer talk...

Front



Its sorta like a washed car and a waxed car...lol...

Rear



I don't know exactly which, but one of the big shooting hunting magazines several years ago, had a guy demonstrating how to hold a revolver for a steady shot... He had his left hand wraped around the front part of the cylinder, and against a tree, he may have been steady for that shot, but I'll bet he was not for the next one, after he picked the lead shavings and powder granules out of his hand...lol...
Also, I remember another front cover where the scope was on a rifle backwards...
Yeah, I'm sayin that I don't all togather trust magazines... If they can let covers like that get by, what about the articles, do the same ones proof them...???
Just was wonderin why the tires did that if there was not somethig on them, that had worn off the tread area...???
Have a good one...Old Dog...
08-24-2011 04:39 PM
Old Dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knifemaker View Post
Cycle World was asked this a while back and was told by four different tire makers- Michlein, Perrelli,Dunlop and Brridgestone that they do not use any "release agent" on their molds.

They did say new tires are a bit slick just do to the rubber being "new"...that simply not pushing them too hard for awhile (50 miles was mentioned) should be enough to break their cherry so to speak...

Clean dry roads being your quickest route there, and to keep in mind warm tires work better, many of the problems (spills) associated with new tires were seen to mostly caused by someone installing a new tire and pushing them at the first turn before they even warmed up.

Keep in mind here racers pull in to change tires in long races, and go right out and race on them hard. The tires are cleaned... But keeping them warm is more important. Race bikes even wear tire heaters between races.

My advise is to skip the parking lot and just avoid grinding the pegs for 30 minutes of riding. This is all I did on my new rear and nothing bad happened....and I think my riding style matches Old Dogs.... Ride it like you stole it...
KM, I wrote up a good reply to yours above, but the weather knocked me off line, and I just got back on today, so I'll keep it shorter and faster...lol...
I'm sure your ridin & style is much better than mine, I'm just old enough to stretch my style over my skills a bit...lol... You gotta get something up every once and again, even if it's just the hair on the back of your neck...lol...
I did however go to an empty baseball parkin lot and do a few figure 8s and slow drag the pegs a bit though...
Have a good one...Old Dog...
08-21-2011 04:19 PM
Knifemaker From wikiapedia:


The properties of sliding friction were discovered by experiment in the 15th to 18th centuries and were expressed as three empirical laws:

Amontons' First Law: The force of friction is directly proportional to the applied load.
Amontons' Second Law: The force of friction is independent of the apparent area of contact.
Coulomb's Law of Friction: Kinetic friction is independent of the sliding velocity.
Amontons' 2nd Law is an idealization assuming perfectly rigid and inelastic materials. For example, wider tires on cars provide more traction than narrow tires for a given vehicle mass because of surface deformation of the tire.[citation needed]
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome