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Thread: Diesel/Biodiesel Vulcans? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-28-2010 08:22 AM
slimvulcanrider I don't remember the details... I will call him up today and ask him what the recipie is... the short version.. lol...
08-28-2010 08:19 AM
vulcanjoe I don't know how the crank was fitted into a small block chevy motor because the olds diesel was based on the 350 rocket olds motor. which if you could come across one was interchangeable with the 455 rocket. we put a few of those in older diesel pickups (pre 6.2l). The 383 stroker is a 350 block with a 400 crank. Most true diesels have steel cylinder sleeves that protrude slightly from the block and the head has a corresponding groove. The gasket sits outside the sleeve the protrusion into the head helps take some pressure off of the gasket. Not to say that the original gasket design wasn't poor, because it was. It should have had at least a multi-layered steel gasket instead of - basically the same gasket as the 350 rocket. The reuse of the torque-to-yield (stretch) led to a lot of subsequent failures because when they are reused they become too thin from stretching and become weak. The use of starting fluids (ether) in these engines also caused head gasket failures. On earlier models that used the Roosa Master injector pump they had a composite fuel metering plate that would deteriorate in time. Rebuilds and later models (after Roosa Master was purchased by Stanadyne) had steel metering plates inside the injector pumps. Fuel filters were also a problem, to the point I carried 2 with me at all times, and the local parts house stocked them just for me.
08-28-2010 02:08 AM
kay
Quote:
Originally Posted by vulcanjoe View Post
Beefier forged steel crank 1980-up but no cylinder sleeves which was the reason for the head gaskets blowing
I was told that the reason many had blown head caskets was because of the cylinder head bolts.


Quote:
Originally Posted by hzhardy View Post
I read once in hot rod magazine that people would send the cranks to get turned down to fit sbc journals and fiTted with the diesel rod would build stroker motors before the aftermarket source were readily available
I was under the impression that a stroker motor was made by taking the crank from a 400 SB and installing it into a 350 SB.
(As in the highly prized 383 stroker)


Quote:
Originally Posted by slimvulcanrider View Post
Some eople still do this.. "WE" (my dad and I) made a stroker a couple years back the way you mentioned to turn a 350 into a 448 Stroker... the thing was a beast...
448 stroker? ...you've peaked my curiosity...please do elaborate.




_______________________
08-27-2010 09:33 PM
slimvulcanrider
Quote:
Originally Posted by hzhardy View Post
I read once in hot rod magazine that people would send the cranks to get turned down to fit sbc journals and fiTted with the diesel rod would build stroker motors before the aftermarket source were readily available
Some eople still do this.. "WE" (my dad and I) made a stroker a couple years back the way you mentioned to turn a 350 into a 448 Stroker... the thing was a beast...
08-27-2010 05:55 PM
hzhardy I read once in hot rod magazine that people would send the cranks to get turned down to fit sbc journals and fiTted with the diesel rod would build stroker motors before the aftermarket source were readily available
08-27-2010 12:02 PM
vulcanjoe Beefier forged steel crank 1980-up but no cylinder sleeves which was the reason for the head gaskets blowing
08-27-2010 01:38 AM
kay
Quote:
Originally Posted by vulcanjoe View Post
the thing with the olds engine was it could easily be converted to gasoline with head and intake swap replace the vacuum pump with a distributor and it actually made a great dirt track motor.
So this block did have a beefier lower end? I didn't know that. But that is normal for a diesel engine block
08-26-2010 10:46 PM
vulcanjoe the thing with the olds engine was it could easily be converted to gasoline with head and intake swap replace the vacuum pump with a distributor and it actually made a great dirt track motor.
08-26-2010 09:21 PM
hzhardy It was the first american diesel venture since the germans invented the diesel engine, so yes the euros had it first. But my post was about a previous post claiming the pontiac diesel engine was a converted gas engine
08-26-2010 01:40 PM
kay
Quote:
Originally Posted by hzhardy View Post
That was one of the first ever diesel applications in a car, and yes there were a lot of problems in the begining. The biggest was the consumers and hometown mechanics knowledge of the new product. they look simmiar to an SBC but by no means is it a converted gas engine. What killed that engine was end of the fuel crisis so oldsmobile gave up. there are some of those engines that still run on the road today, just very rare. Re-use of torque to yeild bolts, adding gas only fuel stabilizers and the absence of a water seperator killed the above engine.
Don't be such a wankel

It may have been the first diesel powered GM car. However it wasn't even close to being one of the first passenger cars produced with a diesel engine.

click here to see an earlier example

And another opinion on this subject:

The primary problem with GM's diesel engines of the 1970s was their design — although the engines used a unique block, the design was based on Oldsmobile's 350 V8. The design had a weakness in the head design and head bolts, which were not able to withstand the higher cylinder pressures and temperatures of diesel use. This design weakness combined with poor diesel fuel quality in the 80's led to catastrophic failure of pistons, cylinder heads, and even cylinder walls. Reinforced truck diesel engines, from GM and other companies, did not have these problems. Today, GM uses diesel engines from DMAX (for trucks) and Isuzu (for non-US cars) but does not offer a diesel engine in any of their North American passenger cars.
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