Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums - Reply to Topic
Wheels, Suspension and Brakes
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Thread: What the fork is this? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-28-2010 09:10 PM
eberghold So...what if you want to put motorcross shocks on? Jk. Old people griping makes my day. Thanks for the info though, think I got a little knowledge out of all of that.
02-12-2010 02:57 PM
VN750Rider/Jerry Totally true. Many riders have made questionable modifications to their bike, some knew what they were doing, some didn't. Hopefully all of them at least tested their modification in a fairly safe place, before going out and riding in traffic. Add to that that while a certain modification might be ok for some riders, it could get other riders in trouble. That is what concerns me. That someone will read about someones modification, and decide to do it themselves, and wind up crashing because of it. When I made my brake modification, I tested it extensively before riding in traffic. It has now been proven in over 25,000 miles of riding. With me as the rider. It might very well not be suitable for someone else at all, which is why I specifically went out of my way to say that I do not recommend that anybody else do it. If they still choose to do so, they do so at their own risk. Jerry.
02-11-2010 11:39 PM
denny6006
Quote:
Originally Posted by antiq View Post
Nearly every rider I've ever met has modded their bikes in some way. Whether it's just changing the position of the handle bars or adding floor boards. Any mods will affect handling either directly to the bike or by changing the riders position. The result can be good or bad from any mod. Ours is not to question the safety of a mod. That is the individual riders responsibility. Cautions are a good thing but lets leave it at that. If I want to stuff a Concours motor in the VN frame I'm not interested in possible center of gravity issues or whether the shocks can handle the extra weight. I'll only be interested in how to do it.
I love plain talk and antiques,spoken like true biker" motorcycle riders are dime a dozen bikers are hard to find"author unknown



02-11-2010 11:23 PM
slimvulcanrider
Quote:
If I want to stuff a Concours motor in the VN frame I'm not interested in possible center of gravity issues or whether the shocks can handle the extra weight.
SSHHH you're giving away our secrets here... lol
02-11-2010 06:20 PM
antiq Nearly every rider I've ever met has modded their bikes in some way. Whether it's just changing the position of the handle bars or adding floor boards. Any mods will affect handling either directly to the bike or by changing the riders position. The result can be good or bad from any mod. Ours is not to question the safety of a mod. That is the individual riders responsibility. Cautions are a good thing but lets leave it at that. If I want to stuff a Concours motor in the VN frame I'm not interested in possible center of gravity issues or whether the shocks can handle the extra weight. I'll only be interested in how to do it.
02-11-2010 05:32 PM
AJCruzin Yep. But typically you're talking about a few MM, unless it's a big jump.
02-11-2010 12:40 PM
skalding As an aside, I wonder if changing tire size affects the handling because we're raising and lowering the front or rear of the bike?
02-11-2010 12:28 PM
AJCruzin Wow, we got really off track there for a bit.

New riders should not modify the stance of their bikes. Experienced riders should not modify the stance of their bikes, unless they are fully aware of what the modifications will do.

Lowered front = tighter steering at the cost of straight line high speed stability.
Lowered rear = better straight line high speed stability at the cost of handling (more turn in effort required)
Lowered front and rear equally = less ground clearance with no change in handling or stability

The question of safety has been strewssed a little too far IMO. Riding a bike is inherently unsafe. Modding your steering geometry is no less or more unsafe, provided you have done your research. The biggest safety factor in raising lowering bikes comes form people making changes and not understanidng the whole picture of how that change affects the total rideability of a bike. Again, this is JMO.

As far as how far up in the triples the frok tubes should be, that *should* be in the service manual. I would not trust the dealer to do it right. On my 650R, and on the 650r of every rider on the 650 forum, the fork legs were set flush with the top clamp. Look in the manual and it very clearly says to be at stock height, the legs must be 10MM above the top clamp. But the dealers were rolling them out the door set up wrong. Maybe someone can pull the spec up from the manual and post it.
02-11-2010 02:27 AM
slimvulcanrider
Quote:
As for adding a proportioning valve, that just makes things more complicated. In case you haven't figured it out by now, I like LESS complicated, as long as it works.
Adding one simple vlave that works like a water faucit is complicated... I have used these simple devices over and over again to tune my breaks for every thing from my DD cars to Track and Strip racers, to adding 4 of them to my Rock Buggies for very tunable brake systems... but you are right... that would make things real complicated and be so much harder to do than removing a brake line, caliper, pads and rotor...

Ohh i lied about price...it's been a while since I ordered one... its 60 bucks
but here is what I am talking about.

if my brother can dial in one of these...any body can...
02-11-2010 02:04 AM
VN750Rider/Jerry The Kawasaki guys did a lot of things right, but not everything. What about the cam chain tensioners? What about the swing arm covers that fall off? What about the joke they call a tool box lid? What about the fact that you have to pull the engine to replace the stator, when an aftermarket company (TOC) came up with a cover that allows you to replace the stator without pulling the engine? I guess Kawasaki wasn't smart enough to figure that one out. And why did they make the stator so weak in the first place? they put way to much brakes on it, and only half enough stator.


The fact is, that my brake mod has been proven in 25,000 miles of use. I have watched it very carefully. There have been no problems. Didn't you say your rotors were cracked? Mine isn't. In fact, it isn't worn or damaged at all. I checked it's thickness against the one I removed 25,000 miles ago, and they are the same. 25,000 miles, and no wear at all. Now, could this be done on other bikes? I have no idea. It did accomplish the improvement in brake feel that I was looking for, did not decrease braking performance or wear, and as for side benefits, now I only have to replace one set of brake pads, and they last just as long as they did with 2 discs. The front wheel looks a lot lighter and cleaner, and speaking of clean, it is now a whole lot easier to keep clean as well. But as I said, I would never suggest anybody else do this, even though I have proven that it works over the long term. I am somebody who understands bikes and knows how to ride them, and I also understand brakes. Still, while my calculations seemed to suggest that it would probably work, I spent a lot of time testing it under controlled conditions, to find out for sure if it would work, before riding it in traffic.

As for adding a proportioning valve, that just makes things more complicated. In case you haven't figured it out by now, I like LESS complicated, as long as it works.

I bought my bike new from a stealer dealer in 2002. They went out of business last year, because they could not get away with ripping people off in this economy. Jerry.
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