Street Survival-On The Ride, 50 Ways to Save Your Life - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
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post #1 of 55 (permalink) Old 12-31-2009, 02:01 PM Thread Starter
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Street Survival-On The Ride, 50 Ways to Save Your Life

I found this on Motorcycle Cruiser Magazine`s site. We have all read similar lists over the almost year and a half that I have been on this forum. With my limited riding experience leading to the crash that has put me on crutches for the past 18 months, I figure that repetition in reading safety posts cannot be a bad thing. So read and meditate on how you can best put these suggestions to use in your riding habits. Happy New Year and safe riding wishes to all.

http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/str...ety/index.html

Gordon

1991 VN 750 -"Cosmic Lady" or "Bad Girl"?
Purchased May 16, 2008
Approx.19,300km (12,000 miles)

H-D windshield
Relocated R/R
MF-AGM battery
Fiamm Freeway Blaster horns
F&S luggage rack and engine guard
Kury Offset Hiway pegs
July 13, 2016, Riding on the DARKSIDE now, Classic Radial 165/80-15


TOP TEN THINGS A NEW RIDER/OWNER SHOULD DO. Click on link.
https://www.vn750.com/forum/11-vn750-general-discussion/9127-top-ten-items-you-would-suggest-new-owner-do-his-new-ride.html
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post #2 of 55 (permalink) Old 12-31-2009, 03:21 PM
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Good advice, but a long list to remember. My Mantra for riding is, was, and always will be just two bits of wisdom:

1. Never hit anything with your bike.

2. Keep in mind at all times that every other vehicle on the road is there with the expressed purpose of trying to kill you.




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post #3 of 55 (permalink) Old 12-31-2009, 04:01 PM
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Right on KM ! That's how I've been riding sence 1979.
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post #4 of 55 (permalink) Old 12-31-2009, 06:48 PM
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I can appreciate the safety mindset in the two simple Mantras submitted. I just want to ask though...how paranoid should I be? Is there a limit to the intensity in which I should fear that people "are trying to kill you". I am currently thinking that people "don't give a shi*" and by telling myself that...I am preparing myself for the idiots that can't drive etc.

2011 Suzuki VSTROM DL650 with ABS Purchased Jan 28 now with 39,000miles WRECKED JAN 12 ,2013
"To strive, to seek, to find, not to yield."
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post #5 of 55 (permalink) Old 12-31-2009, 07:36 PM
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Your paranoia should not extend to the point that you are no longer having fun being on your bike.

It is more of a gentle acceptance that they are all out to kill you, but you being better, smarter and faster are out there to foil all their plans....it is more or less a game you are playing with them. ... your advantage is they do not know, that you know, that they are trying to kill you, so you are allowed to have some fun with it all. You of course have to keep a constant watch for their every move, and have stratagies in place to counter all of theirs.

The the next biggest advantage to you is , because you do know they are all trying to kill you, you can not get mad at them for doing so. Too many times riders get "pissed" at some pinheaded driver, and end up making mistakes, loosing the "Fun of being on your bike"... or worse yet do something stupid like flipping off the wrong driver. Anger is not a good emotion to have...especialy while riding. Remember what happend to Aniken Skywalker..........

So, if the guy in the cadilac cuts you off, you can not get mad at him...he is only trying to do his job (kill you)...the only person you should be angery at is youself.. for not seeing it coming.

The key here is just simply accept they have their mission, and yours of course is to make them fail. If you can not do this while remaining emotionally detatched from their actions, you should not be piloting a motorcycle.

Thus you must be confident that your skills are superior to theirs.


KM

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Last edited by Knifemaker; 12-31-2009 at 07:40 PM.
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post #6 of 55 (permalink) Old 12-31-2009, 10:46 PM
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Thanks for posting, Hoss. Some helpful tips there.

I'm keepin' all the left over parts. I'm gonna use 'em to build another bike!
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post #7 of 55 (permalink) Old 12-31-2009, 11:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knifemaker View Post
Good advice, but a long list to remember. My Mantra for riding is, was, and always will be just two bits of wisdom:

1. Never hit anything with your bike.

2. Keep in mind at all times that every other vehicle on the road is there with the expressed purpose of trying to kill you.




KM
I agree that you cannot remember all of the bits and pieces of advice given for safe riding here, or anywhere all the time. Your two part mantra sumarizes it all, and serves you, with 30+ years riding experience, very well by your own account.

My purpose in posting these safety tips is to help the many newcomers to riding to be able to read and then visualize themselves applying the individual principle being highlighted, while sitting at home. Practice it over in your mind, just like doing a preride inspection, so that in time it becomes an automatic reflex action, with little or no conscious thought to respond.

KM, I believe that is the point you have attained in your riding skills. You do not have to think about individual responses to traffic moving around you. Your "brain speed", honed by many years of experience, allows you to see, decide on a couse of action, and execute it in a fraction of the time it would take me or many other new riders.

Let me illustrate a similar idea with an example from my own life. I have been driving for over 50 of my near 57 years. I slide behind the wheel, insert the key, start the car, put on my seatbelt, check/adjust the mirrors, engage the brake, shift into gear, shoulder check and smoothly pull out in more or less one fluid movement. It takes me less time to do it than to describe it.

One of my sons-in-law, at age 27, had hardly ever driven when he married my oldest daughter. She did most of the driving for the first several years they were married. He came with me to bring the car home from the service station at Christmas time about 10 years ago. When we were ready to go, I stood waiting to open the door (it was about -30*C outside, so I wanted to open and close the door as quickly as possible for the comfort of the other mechanics in the shop.) He got in and started the car, so I opened the door. He then fiddled around for at least a couple of minutes adjusting mirrors, putting on the seatbelt, yada, yada, yada, until he finally pulled out. I could have pulled out and back in again 4 or 5 times by the time he finally got out so I could close the door.

I was losing patience with him because he had to make each move deliberately, and think about it, where for me it was all an almost automatic action.

So to all you new riders like me, read all you can at home and think about how it applies to you, do some "chair riding" and practice just as though you are riding the bike.

Then later, on every ride you make, pick one area of your riding you want to improve, and critique yourself or have an experienced riding buddy do it for you if possible.

Gordon

1991 VN 750 -"Cosmic Lady" or "Bad Girl"?
Purchased May 16, 2008
Approx.19,300km (12,000 miles)

H-D windshield
Relocated R/R
MF-AGM battery
Fiamm Freeway Blaster horns
F&S luggage rack and engine guard
Kury Offset Hiway pegs
July 13, 2016, Riding on the DARKSIDE now, Classic Radial 165/80-15


TOP TEN THINGS A NEW RIDER/OWNER SHOULD DO. Click on link.
https://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9127

Last edited by OlHossCanada; 01-05-2010 at 11:56 AM.
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post #8 of 55 (permalink) Old 01-01-2010, 02:00 AM
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I have to totally agree with KM here. Be as paranoid as possible without making your ride miserable. Whether everybody out there is actually trying to get you is irrelevant, their behavior is the same. You have to look for danger in everything, and be ready for it. That attitude has gotten me safely through 35 years and over 400,000 miles of street riding. After a few years, it eventually becomes instinctive, you see, anticipate, and react without thinking about it. But it is still one reason why I spend so many miles and so much time on interstate highways. You can back off just a little, and relax and enjoy the ride a little more. Also another reason I don't care for sportbikes any more. Too much work. Now I like to just hit the interstate and cruise, hour after hour, mile after mile. Much better than sitting in a recliner in front of a TV.

I think 2010 is about here. Counting down the minutes....... Happy New Year!!!!!!! Jerry.



Looks like I got in the first post of the year, AZ time. EXACTLY 12:00 am, 2010!!!!!!!

I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker.


1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike

Last edited by VN750Rider/Jerry; 01-01-2010 at 02:35 AM.
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post #9 of 55 (permalink) Old 01-01-2010, 02:30 AM
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"Your paranoia should not extend to the point that you are no longer having fun being on your bike." I just couldn't resist posting this. I believe the same thing applies to "gear". There is such a thing as to much gear. There is such a thing as "to much" of anything. Spending 20 minutes putting on gear, and another 20 minutes taking it off, for a 10 minute ride, is beyond absurd. Just take the car. Even on a longer ride, to much "gear" can ruin your ride. Use some common sense. Wear long pants, sturdy shoes, a jacket if it is not to hot, and always a helmet. Put at least as much thought into dressing to prevent a crash (high visibility) as preparing for one. Remember, all the gear in the world, besides a helmet, will only protect you from abrasion injuries, it will not prevent broken bones or serious internal injuries from an impact with something besides the road, and it will not protect you from serious damage to muscles, tendons, and ligaments when you go tumbling end over end down the road. All of this is of course my own personal opinion, and nothing else.

As for things 20 feet in front of you, I have successfully countersteered around objects as close or closer than 20 feet away many times, sometimes missing them by inches, but I would have hit them had I done nothing. Jerry.

I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker.


1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike
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post #10 of 55 (permalink) Old 01-01-2010, 09:40 AM
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That's a good list. Thanks for posting.

That being said, I agree with KM as those are two very good rules to ride by. Hitting anything with one's bike is generally incompatible with the desire to live as much a pain-free existence as possible (aside from the incompatibility with life in general issues). The fact that they're all out to kill us is pretty well a given...

--FA

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VROC #28807
Decatur, TX
'03 VN750 "Serenity"

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