how about this for safety? - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-10-2009, 07:53 AM Thread Starter
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how about this for safety?

how about this for safety? NEVER get into the habit of applying only your rear brake first.
yesterday i went on a cruise around, and the light turned yellow while i was going fairly fast. so i panicked and hit the brakes. however i hit the rear brake first and pretty hard. so i spent a good portion of road fishtailing. luckily i remembered what they taught me at the MSF class and held in there.
WHEW.

other than that, it was a good riding day.
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-10-2009, 08:37 AM
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whew - that was hairy!
same thing happened to me - some impatient prick turned left in front of me. But since I always cover both brakes when approaching intersections, no matter what the color of the light, or if there is no light at all, it was a safe, quick stop and a down shift.

MSF course rocks!

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-10-2009, 09:15 AM
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Just a few tips that I strongly remember from my MSFC:

I usually cover both brakes at intersections and use 70% front / 30% rear of course that is applying gentile pressure.

It might take an extra 5 seconds to get somewhere you should always slow down at intersections with signals.

Always practice the 4 second rule when following other vehicles.

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-10-2009, 04:37 PM
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Whille I agree that everyone should practice "panic stopping" using BOTH brakes, I would not reccomend learning to use the front one first either.

There are many times the rear brake is the better choice, not neccessarily in a "panic" situation. If you want to see how fast you can get your bike to slam you into the pavement grab a handfull of front brake with all that adreniline pumping on a wet road or going down a gravel driveway.

The real key is to learn how to use both brakes, and WHEN to use just the front or just the rear.

My FJR has "linked" brakes, in that I can stomp on the rear brake and part of that energy is used to apply pressure on one of the front discs. And I can do this with little fear as the bike also has ABS. (anti-lock brake system)

None the less....I still practice panic stops, breaking in turns, and constantly try to get a "feel" of how each brake works that day.

Practicing those "panic" stops may not keep you from overbraking in a real situation, but will give you some feedback so you know what limit you are at when the time comes.

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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-10-2009, 05:52 PM
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Having very little practice in using my front brake and/or making fast/emergency stops, was one of the things that contributed to the accident that broke my leg. I have done a lot of reading online and in books, over the past 10+ months since the accident. One thing I have learned from the many experienced riding writers is that I MUST practice maximum emergency braking, when I can ride again. Wear my best crash gear and find an empty parking lot or back street in an industrial park, and start slow at 18-20mph. Then work up a couple of mph at a time.

Everything that I`ve read on using the front brake emphasized applying it gradually, so as to preload the weight onto the front tire for maximum braking traction. I believe that it was in David Hough`s book "Proficient Motorcycling 2", where I read how long that preload should take. He says 1 second, the time it takes to count "one thousand and one". If you are hard on the front brake faster than that, you need to slow down.

He also gives a simple easy practice you can do anytime and anywhere. Hold your left hand in front of you with the thumb and forefinger extended. Grip them as though the finger is the front brake lever, and squeeze the thumb and finger together slowly while counting out "one thousand and one". Practice 5-10 reps several time during the day, until the correct tempo becomes ingrained in your mind and muscles.

Even though the front brake has the greatest stopping potential, I have to learn to use the rear brake moderately too, if only to slow the large rotating mass of the tire and wheel assembly, and take that extra load of energy off the front brake. Using the rear brake also acts to help transfer weight onto the front tire for more traction there.

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-10-2009, 10:17 PM
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I got into an arguement with the ALTMOSt evaluator over braking. When i learned to ride the preferred method was to use the rear brake first and transfer weight to the front wheel then brake the front. I still ride this way today out of " conditioning". All i do is use the tear brake and them milliseconds later follow with the front brake. As I was taught this will transfer weight to the front wheel and possibly keep it from sliding on slippery surfaces.

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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-11-2009, 10:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OlHossCanada View Post
Having very little practice in using my front brake and/or making fast/emergency stops, was one of the things that contributed to the accident that broke my leg. I have done a lot of reading online and in books, over the past 10+ months since the accident. One thing I have learned from the many experienced riding writers is that I MUST practice maximum emergency braking, when I can ride again. Wear my best crash gear and find an empty parking lot or back street in an industrial park, and start slow at 18-20mph. Then work up a couple of mph at a time.

Everything that I`ve read on using the front brake emphasized applying it gradually, so as to preload the weight onto the front tire for maximum braking traction. I believe that it was in David Hough`s book "Proficient Motorcycling 2", where I read how long that preload should take. He says 1 second, the time it takes to count "one thousand and one". If you are hard on the front brake faster than that, you need to slow down.

He also gives a simple easy practice you can do anytime and anywhere. Hold your left hand in front of you with the thumb and forefinger extended. Grip them as though the finger is the front brake lever, and squeeze the thumb and finger together slowly while counting out "one thousand and one". Practice 5-10 reps several time during the day, until the correct tempo becomes ingrained in your mind and muscles.
Even though the front brake has the greatest stopping potential, I have to learn to use the rear brake moderately too, if only to slow the large rotating mass of the tire and wheel assembly, and take that extra load of energy off the front brake. Using the rear brake also acts to help transfer weight onto the front tire for more traction there.
Great tip, OlHoss!!!
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-11-2009, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by achang1 View Post
how about this for safety? NEVER get into the habit of applying only your rear brake first.
yesterday i went on a cruise around, and the light turned yellow while i was going fairly fast. so i panicked and hit the brakes. however i hit the rear brake first and pretty hard. so i spent a good portion of road fishtailing. luckily i remembered what they taught me at the MSF class and held in there.
WHEW.

other than that, it was a good riding day.
Achang1, I really do not think your rear wheel lockup was caused by applying the rear brake first.... rather, I think it was caused by too much pressure, too fast on the rear brake. I have seen many panic stops.... both while teaching the MSF course and while observing during training sessions.

remember that braking should be a progressive event, not an agressive event. In other words.... rather than Grabbing both brakes agressively try to continually squeeze the brakes, practice this and it will be how you brake in an emergency. you will stop safer and shorter

just my opinion, best of luck

Stan

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