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Engine / Exhaust / Cooling
\ From the radiator, through the case and out
the exhaust. If it has to do with the cooling,
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post #31 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 09:54 AM Thread Starter
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The pair I received had Teflon tape on them. I’m sure this is to stop any oil from seeping out. I removed the bolt on the coolant reservoir and tilted it forward and was able to install the tensioner. My concern is the bolts that mount the tensioner to the head are in the way of really getting a snug grip on the lock nut in the center. I have a few 17mm wrenches that fit but no clear angle to get a real good turn on it for piece of mind. I was curious if there was some kind of wrench that I can keep with me if I ever need to tweak the right side. I’ve never claimed to be a mechanic so my tool knowledge in that category is novice at best. I have plenty of other tools but more geared towards carpentry and electrical/electronics. I don’t want it to vibrate loose while I’m riding. Thread lock is a good idea but I thought there might be some kind of specialty wrench out there for this application. I may be overthinking this as I tend to do that
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post #32 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 10:05 AM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=Spockster;1283833]
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Originally Posted by mmart View Post
So I got my TOC MCCTs finally (took longer because of a postal error), I installed them yesterday and tweaked them as expected. The clacking noise is gone so needless to say I’m satisfied there. The noise was clearly coming from the left as you can hear in my video in the first post but I went ahead and changed both. I’m curious what others have used to keep the lock nut tight on the right side. Even with the coolant bottle loose it’s a b-tch. I’ve looked up multiple types of stubby 17mm wrenches but mostly everything I see I’m sure won’t fit.
Could get a cheap wrench from Harbor Frieght and cut it off.

The locknut doesn't have to be super tight, just snug to hold the adjuster from turning.[/QUOTE


I have this little wrench that I got with a set of bifold closet doors that slides under the guide to adjust the height. It could easily be cut but its for a 15mm nut. I thought I got lucky for once but no go. My cutting capabilities are limited to either a dremmel or a hacksaw.
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post #33 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 10:51 AM
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No need for threadlock, maybe you can shave a little bit off the outsides of a 17mm wrench using a dremel to get good clearance. Otherwise, even if the bolt loosens up a bit you'll hear it before it causes any damage. The chain won't go completely slack as long as the MCCT is installed on the bike. If you can get it decently snug, you're safe, doesn't have to be torqued down.

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post #34 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 12:20 PM Thread Starter
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No need for threadlock, maybe you can shave a little bit off the outsides of a 17mm wrench using a dremel to get good clearance. Otherwise, even if the bolt loosens up a bit you'll hear it before it causes any damage. The chain won't go completely slack as long as the MCCT is installed on the bike. If you can get it decently snug, you're safe, doesn't have to be torqued down.
Thanks, That’s good info, I was worrying a bit because when I was tuning them with the lock nut all the way backed off it looked as if the vibration was backing the main bolt out so I wanted to make sure I wasn’t causing myself more problems.
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post #35 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 01:36 PM
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I use an offset box wrench, but as I adjust the bolt tighter as time goes on, I am running into clearance issues where the thickness of the wrench is thicker than the space between the bolt and the lock nut. This wouldn't be an issue if the bolt head was a smaller size than the lock nut, allowing the wrench to slide over it without interference. I just need to get a longer bolt.

I've actually been pondering this clearance problem for a while, and think that it's possible that a piece of spring steel could replace the lock nut. it would be held in place on top of the mcct with the standard mounting bolts, and have a 4-sided protrusion (shaped like an open-ended wrench, but made of sheet metal) that would capture the position of the bolt, preventing it from turning, but could be pulled away from the bolt head with your fingers when you needed to adjust the tension. Haven't made a prototype yet.

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post #36 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 02:45 PM Thread Starter
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I use an offset box wrench, but as I adjust the bolt tighter as time goes on, I am running into clearance issues where the thickness of the wrench is thicker than the space between the bolt and the lock nut. This wouldn't be an issue if the bolt head was a smaller size than the lock nut, allowing the wrench to slide over it without interference. I just need to get a longer bolt.

I've actually been pondering this clearance problem for a while, and think that it's possible that a piece of spring steel could replace the lock nut. it would be held in place on top of the mcct with the standard mounting bolts, and have a 4-sided protrusion (shaped like an open-ended wrench, but made of sheet metal) that would capture the position of the bolt, preventing it from turning, but could be pulled away from the bolt head with your fingers when you needed to adjust the tension. Haven't made a prototype yet.
Surprisingly I understand what you’re saying. That would’ve saved some cursing over the weekend. I get that the MCCTs are aftermarket and technically you shouldn’t need to get a wrench in this spot, but if you look at the front side of the right cylinder it really looks like there is a spot where a CCT could’ve gone. Now before anyone goes into how the internals of the cylinder are positioned I’m sure it’s not that simple, but it begs the question as to why did Kawasaki not design it that way to begin with??
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post #37 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 02:51 PM
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There is nothing that cannot be done with a Dremel and a reinforced cutoff wheel. I go through about 20 of those wheels a month. They are $1 apiece. Mine have plenty of room between the head of the bolt and locknut. As for the 2 acorn nuts that hold the tensioner on, you can get a little more clearance by removing the outside one. The other one will hold the tensioner in place just fine while you snug up the locknut. Once adjusted, mine never needed to be adjusted again in over 90,000 miles. I just hope there wasn't much damage to your chains and all of the guides caused by running it loose. Mine never made a noise anywhere near that loud.

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post #38 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
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since the switch it’s been real quiet so we’ll see how long it holds up. Fingers crossed. As far as the wrench I’m going to see what else I have laying around that can be sacrificed. Good project for the next rainy day. But to the point I made earlier, doesn’t this look like a great hassle free spot for a CCT?
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post #39 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-09-2020, 10:20 PM
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since the switch it’s been real quiet so we’ll see how long it holds up. Fingers crossed. As far as the wrench I’m going to see what else I have laying around that can be sacrificed. Good project for the next rainy day. But to the point I made earlier, doesn’t this look like a great hassle free spot for a CCT?
Looks like a good spot, if it would work there.

Looks like it must be a 17mm wrench you need? Some bike tool kits might have one, they make some of those out of soft thin steel. Even some of the thicker (but cheaper) ones will cut easy with a hacksaw.

I take these for granted since I have a drawer full of them. Thicker, but probably like cutting a bad steak.

Found some: https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...Desc=0&_sop=15


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post #40 of 48 (permalink) Old 03-10-2020, 06:25 AM
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I have a ton of those "tool kit" wrenches, and probably over a dozen never used tool kits removed from bikes that were sold or traded.

Like I said before, there are a LOT of things about the Vulcan engine that don't make sense. It is an engineering nightmare. It may have been designed by several engineers who never communicated with each other, but I personally feel that it went through a lot of changes from the original design. I think it was originally intended to be chain drive, and was converted to shaft drive, which would explain the clunky front bevel gearcase. I also don't believe it was ever meant to be a cruiser engine, which could explain the hydraulic valves and lack of access to the stator. They may have used hydraulic valves because there would have been no way to get to the valves in the Vulcan frame. They just didn't care about the stator. It might also explain the convoluted intake system. Some think it may have originally been intended to be a sportbike engine. I remember a really old article from a magazine test back in the '80s that said it was "a Ferrari engine in a chopped and channeled '50 Mercury coupe" It certainly is an oddball design for a cruiser engine. All other cruiser v-twins are a lot simpler, and make most of their power down low. The Vulcan 750 make it's best power near redline, which explains the four cams, four valves per cylinder, four plugs, two carbs, and super short stroke. But I also find it odd that they used a single crankpin and added a counterbalance instead of using staggered crankpins. While not most cruiser riders cup of tea, it is this characteristic that makes it so good at high speed long distance highway cruising, and so smooth and comfortable at highway speeds. It's like a sport touring bike (which always seemed like an oxymoron to me) that actually has a comfortable riding position. However the Vulcan engine wound up the way it did will probably always remain an enigma.

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1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike
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