Bike won't start - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
Carbs and Fuel System
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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-04-2011, 10:59 PM Thread Starter
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Bike won't start

I've let her sit with the fuel on for about 3 weeks now without running her. I just went to fire her up today and I believe that it is either the spark plugs or the fact that the carbs are flooded. Turns over nice, brand new battery (hooked up the charger after this fiasco). But couldn't get it started. I don't have time tonight as I'm about to have to get ready for work here in a lil. What do you guys think I should check for? I have a service manual in .pdf but it has crap pictures that I can barely make out. Never tore a carb apart b4 but I know I can.

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Unclemoney.

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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-04-2011, 11:30 PM
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As a rookie here:

Drain the bowls via the nipple and screw on the bottom of each then close it up. Turn the engine over maybe 20 times, and drain the bowls again. That will show if your moving fuel.

If the engine is flooded, open the throttle all the way and it should cough a few times and finally catch.

If the engine is flooded bad enough, the engine will hydraulic lock. It will make a clank while turning over and stop. In this case, pull a plug on each head and turn it over again to blow all the fuel out. It'd be best to make sure the open spark plug wire is well away from the open plug hole.

For spark, I like to pull the boot and cover the open end of the wire with your hand. You'll know if you have a spark Better'n coffee in the morning!

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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-05-2011, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spiral_72 View Post
As a rookie here:

Drain the bowls via the nipple and screw on the bottom of each then close it up. Turn the engine over maybe 20 times, and drain the bowls again. That will show if your moving fuel.

If the engine is flooded, open the throttle all the way and it should cough a few times and finally catch.

If the engine is flooded bad enough, the engine will hydraulic lock. It will make a clank while turning over and stop. In this case, pull a plug on each head and turn it over again to blow all the fuel out. It'd be best to make sure the open spark plug wire is well away from the open plug hole.

For spark, I like to pull the boot and cover the open end of the wire with your hand. You'll know if you have a spark Better'n coffee in the morning!


Turning the petcock to the off position when you finish riding for the day is a good habit to get in to.
If your engine is flooded, better open up your oil filler cap and give it the sniff test. Make sure it doesn't smell like fuel in the crankcase. If it does, I would change the oil before running the engine much.
Once running again, I would run some seafoam through the next few tanks of gas.

Have a good one ...

~~C8> Ratt
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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-05-2011, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you guys very much. Will do when I get up! Just got back from the jail, easy night. Graves are great minus the hours lol.

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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 03-08-2012, 06:12 AM
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Turning the petcock to the off position when you finish riding for the day is a good habit to get in to.
If your engine is flooded, better open up your oil filler cap and give it the sniff test. Make sure it doesn't smell like fuel in the crankcase. If it does, I would change the oil before running the engine much.
Once running again, I would run some seafoam through the next few tanks of gas.

Have a good one ...
Turning the petcock to the off position when you finish riding for the day. A god habit to get into.
Please tell me the advantages of doing this. Until I've live a 1000 years and lived a 1000 life times. I will always be a newbie. Your never to old to learn new tips.
Thank you
Ray
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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 03-08-2012, 10:20 AM
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There's no reason to turn the fuel tap off on the Vulcan , it has a vacuum operated valve that keeps gas from flowing go the carb when the bike is not running. If your carb is flooding overnight, the valve in the petcock is bad.

Turning it off each night is just fixing the symptom and not the cause.

Older bikes, and riders did not have vacuum valves in their petcocks, so it was common practise to turn the tap off when you parked the bike....(as a tiny bit of crap could hold the valve needle in the carb open and flood the carb)

I always left my vulcans petcock in the ON position, never had a problem and never got embarrassed by forgetting to turn the fuel on when riding off.

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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 03-08-2012, 10:24 AM
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There's no reason to turn the fuel tap off on the Vulcan , it has a vacuum operated valve that keeps gas from flowing go the carb when the bike is not running. If your carb is flooding overnight, the valve in the petcock is bad.

Turning it off each night is just fixing the symptom and not the cause.

Older bikes, and riders did not have vacuum valves in their petcocks, so it was common practise to turn the tap off when you parked the bike....(as a tiny bit of crap could hold the valve needle in the carb open and flood the carb)

I always left my vulcans petcock in the ON position, never had a problem and never got embarrassed by forgetting to turn the fuel on when riding off.
x2 Most if not all modern bikes don't have petcocks to turn off now anyway
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 03-08-2012, 11:01 AM
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x2 Most if not all modern bikes don't have petcocks to turn off now anyway
Well, that mostly due to them having fuel injection. They have fuel pumps like cars do. Several bikes don't even have real gas tanks. The thing in front of the seat looks like one, but the gas tank is under the seat or even inside the frame.

The act of turning off the petcock is just old school habit, although there are still a few bikes on the road with gravity fed vacuumless petcocks...

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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 03-08-2012, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by qxinfinity View Post
Turning the petcock to the off position when you finish riding for the day. A god habit to get into.
Please tell me the advantages of doing this. Until I've live a 1000 years and lived a 1000 life times. I will always be a newbie. Your never to old to learn new tips.
Thank you
Ray
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wow ... thread resurrection ... I can't tell if your being facetious. Not really a God habit ... right?
Historically, the advantage has been to keep fuel from running out of containment while parked due to a rare but unanticipated mechanical failure of the carburators float needle valves or fuel contamination preventing a good seal of the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knifemaker View Post
There's no reason to turn the fuel tap off on the Vulcan , it has a vacuum operated valve that keeps gas from flowing go the carb when the bike is not running. If your carb is flooding overnight, the valve in the petcock is bad.

Turning it off each night is just fixing the symptom and not the cause.

Older bikes, and riders did not have vacuum valves in their petcocks, so it was common practise to turn the tap off when you parked the bike....(as a tiny bit of crap could hold the valve needle in the carb open and flood the carb)

I always left my vulcans petcock in the ON position, never had a problem and never got embarrassed by forgetting to turn the fuel on when riding off.
I agree that the probability of a fuel spill related failure mode is decreased with the vacuum valve, but is is still not 100% reliable. Congratulations on not having any issues with it personally. This thread is case in point that some folks do (or might). Using the cutoff may not make it 100% either, but it significantly reduces the odds of spillage. If there is a problem, I would still rather not discover it by finding a fuel puddle under my bike, or in my crankcase or jugs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swagman View Post
x2 Most if not all modern bikes don't have petcocks to turn off now anyway
yea ... most new bikes are fuel injected. Not the VN750.

In the end, I still think getting in the habit of turning the petcock to the off position is a good idea for the aging carburated VN750. Evidently the designers didn't completely trust the vacuum valve either, and it really isn't all that much trouble, is it?
But hey, that's just how I roll, and what I advise. Assess the risks for yourself, and do your own thing.

~~C8>

P.S. - sorry for the slow reply ... lol
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 03-08-2012, 11:51 AM
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My Fazer 1000 is carburated and has no petcock to switch off so getting into the habit is difficult, (well the remembering is) petcock on todays ride no petcock on tomorrows ride I would nerver remember to turn on and off so I guess i'll leave on
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