Uggggg!! Stator. - Page 2 - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
Electrical
Where does this wire go?
Includes Electrical mods, Lights, Stator,
Rectifier, Diagrams, etc

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post #11 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-01-2019, 11:51 PM
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The original stator in my 2002 model lasted past 70,000 miles. I just bought a 1997 with 21,000 on it. Right now the stator is working great. But it could die at any time. In my current condition I don't know if I would try to replace it or not. If I were in good health, I would take the rewound one out of the 2002 and use it. I might just cut the frame to get it out of the bike. I put considerable thought in just pulling the engine out of the '97 and putting it in the '02, but that is more work than I can handle now. I found the splines good on the '97, and that gives me hope that everything else is ok as well.

When I had a 1985 Goldwing, someone figured out how to mount a Suzuki car alternator on the outside of the engine, and install a pulley on the front of the crankshaft. The 1984-1987 Goldwings were also known for stator failures, and you had to pull the engine to replace one. The alternator setup solved a lot of problems. It was easy to replace if it failed, and it did not need a RR. That was part of the alternator. It put out a lot more power than a typical motorcycle stator. But the biggest advantage to having a true alternator (like the 1988 and up Goldwings have) is that the output is controlled by the load. On a typical motorcycle stator/RR setup, the stator puts out full power at all times, and the RR takes any unused current and literally shorts it to ground. That makes them get hot, which is why they have a heat sink. About the dumbest idea I've ever heard of, but almost all motorcycles use it. I believe I saw a picture of a Vulcan 750 with an externally mounted alternator somewhere. Done right, that could be a permanent solution to the stator issue.
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post #12 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-06-2019, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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I took off a bunch of stuff while waiting for parts and supplies to be delivered. I purchased a stator from Rick's Motorsport Electrics. I'll report back on it in a while to let you all know how it works. I bought a Tuxedo Mod kit from CG-Extreme Graphics. My plan is to take out the case and cut it off the bike so I don't get any shavings in the motor and will have easy access in the event I need a stator repair in the future.

Here's my question. It looks to me like there is enough room on top to simply lift the motor a couple inches and access the bottom bolts. Does it really have to be tilted? Am I missing something?
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post #13 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-06-2019, 12:08 PM
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The big problem is clearance to get the cover off the end of the shifter shaft. You can get it all loose, but the tilt has to happen to get it off the shaft.

Should inspect the damper bushings while it's opened up.
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post #14 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-08-2019, 09:42 PM
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Stock stators are excellent. They last the longest. People complain when their 1990 VN750's 29 year old stator dies..... *roll eyes* They are a rock. Next best thing is much cheaper and identical.... Ricks Stator. There is actually an advantage to a Ricks, which is that it puts out 14v below 1000 rpm. Stock stators tend to dip at idle causing brown-outs in voltage. That does not happen with a Ricks. Average price is $150, but I've seen them on ebay as cheap as $75 when someone sells one they bought and never fixed their bike before selling it. My first and only choice is Ricks. There are plenty of reviews on Ricks here. Mine last year was the most recent.
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post #15 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-10-2019, 06:26 AM
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Series regulator

A series regulator will help your stator last a lot longer. SH775 is a good choice for our bikes. Sea doo part number 710001103 or Polaris 4012941. Brand new they're around $150-$200 but used ones can be found for $30-$75. Beware of fakes. A real one will have the part number printed on the opposite end of the plugs. SH847 is another choice but is more expensive and not really needed. It's for bikes going over 8000 rpms. Good luck and enjoy the ride.
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post #16 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-16-2019, 09:04 AM Thread Starter
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After much thought and reflection, my buddy and I came up with a plan. We are creating a jig to bolt onto the case so we can use a 4.25 inch hole saw to cut a clean circle. Running it in reverse with plenty of cutting oil should keep shavings in the pudding we'll be creating and nothing will get near the engine until we cut through. I'll take pictures as we go along. It could be a more elegant solution than using the dremel and cutting an ugly circle with debris flying everywhere.
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post #17 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-16-2019, 08:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Bone View Post
Running it in reverse with plenty of cutting oil

I'm hoping you have a "plan B". I just can't imagine a hole-saw doing much of anything in reverse! Could be wrong, though. Gotta try a few things to find the best way sometimes.

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post #18 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-16-2019, 09:42 PM
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That's my first reaction too. Good luck though!

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post #19 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-16-2019, 10:28 PM
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In soft metals, running saws backwards can help get smoother cuts and prevent getting hung up in the material. Table/circular carbide saws are sometimes run backwards to cut aluminum siding, etc.

Haven't heard of anyone doing it in really thick stock... band saw blades intended for aluminum still have forward-pointing teeth, but with low to no hook angle.

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post #20 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-17-2019, 08:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorn View Post
In soft metals, running saws backwards can help get smoother cuts and prevent getting hung up in the material. Table/circular carbide saws are sometimes run backwards to cut aluminum siding, etc.

Haven't heard of anyone doing it in really thick stock... band saw blades intended for aluminum still have forward-pointing teeth, but with low to no hook angle.
Yep! You can flip a circular saw blade over and use it to cut sheets of metal roofing. Cleanest and quickest way to cut, even four sheets at a time.

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