ACCT Thoughts - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
VN750 General Discussion

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-22-2011, 02:00 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 59
iTrader: (0)
 
Lightbulb ACCT Thoughts

I've had my '03 with only 6200 miles on it for just a few weeks now and have been working out all the general concerns including; bad battery and R/R replaced w/ MF & new R/R relocated, missing peg, about 38 oz of excess oil and 6 oz of excess coolant, lubed the splines which had a thin clay like residue on them but still in perfect condition, loose cheap champion plugs with bad gaps and now tonight I replaced the FWD ACCT spring with a new one from TOC. Before I continue, keep in mind that I rode this thing from place of purchase 110 miles until the battery died just 2 miles from my exit and up until that point I thought it had a nice power band compared to my Ninja 250.
So the first thing I did to the ACCT was the Grambo trick and found that the FWD unit had some static friction that needed to be set free. I could only get about 3/4 turn out of it after breaking the friction and then put some gear lube in it and re-capped. I did this a couple more times over the past weeks and later got a few good turns out of the spring.
As for the rear unit, at the time that I dumped out the excess coolant, I removed the screw cap on the ACCT and some oil dribbled out of it; perhaps from the engine having an excess of it. So here is where my thoughts begin.
The FWD unit is at a different angle than the AFT and sits higher relative to the oil pan and maybe because of this, doesn't get the regular splash of oil and also stay a little cooler. I will no doubt replace the spring in the AFT unit in the future, but it's not high on my list at this point.
Back to the FWD unit. When I pulled it apart, it seemed to be in good shape and turned easy enough and still had much of the oil I had been shooting into it. I cleaned everything up, then watched the TOC video one more time. Piece O' Cake! That little tool they 'give' you with the rebuild kit makes the job simple. BTW, I put my calipers on the old spring(.0245") and the new TOC(.0262) give or take a red hair.
While assembling the unit, I didn't just smear a little Red 'N Tacky on the threads, I packed the barrel with the stuff until it extruded out of the other end. Use your finger to pack the female thread and then screw the thread in and back out, repeat a few times until the stuff comes out the other side.
The fun part. I reinstalled the ACCT, opend the garage door just enough to let the exaust out, because I had already showered for the night and was in my slippers and boxers, fired her up and no chatter.
All concerns went out the garage door along with most of the CO. I love this bike! ...and my wife for letting me keep my Ninja too.
TimV65 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-22-2011, 01:42 PM
Old Fart
 
Knifemaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Catawissa, MO
Posts: 11,637
iTrader: (4)
     
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimV65 View Post
I've had my '03 with only 6200 miles on it for just a few weeks now and have been working out all the general concerns including; bad battery and R/R replaced w/ MF & new R/R relocated, missing peg, about 38 oz of excess oil and 6 oz of excess coolant, lubed the splines which had a thin clay like residue on them but still in perfect condition, loose cheap champion plugs with bad gaps and now tonight I replaced the FWD ACCT spring with a new one from TOC.

Before I continue, keep in mind that I rode this thing from place of purchase 110 miles until the battery died just 2 miles from my exit and up until that point I thought it had a nice power band compared to my Ninja 250.


So the first thing I did to the ACCT was the Grambo trick and found that the FWD unit had some static friction that needed to be set free. I could only get about 3/4 turn out of it after breaking the friction and then put some gear lube in it and re-capped. I did this a couple more times over the past weeks and later got a few good turns out of the spring.

As for the rear unit, at the time that I dumped out the excess coolant, I removed the screw cap on the ACCT and some oil dribbled out of it; perhaps from the engine having an excess of it. So here is where my thoughts begin.
The FWD unit is at a different angle than the AFT and sits higher relative to the oil pan and maybe because of this, doesn't get the regular splash of oil and also stay a little cooler. I will no doubt replace the spring in the AFT unit in the future, but it's not high on my list at this point.

Back to the FWD unit. When I pulled it apart, it seemed to be in good shape and turned easy enough and still had much of the oil I had been shooting into it. I cleaned everything up, then watched the TOC video one more time. Piece O' Cake! That little tool they 'give' you with the rebuild kit makes the job simple. BTW, I put my calipers on the old spring(.0245") and the new TOC(.0262) give or take a red hair.

While assembling the unit, I didn't just smear a little Red 'N Tacky on the threads, I packed the barrel with the stuff until it extruded out of the other end. Use your finger to pack the female thread and then screw the thread in and back out, repeat a few times until the stuff comes out the other side.

The fun part. I reinstalled the ACCT, opend the garage door just enough to let the exaust out, because I had already showered for the night and was in my slippers and boxers, fired her up and no chatter.

All concerns went out the garage door along with most of the CO. I love this bike! ...and my wife for letting me keep my Ninja too.
fixed it for ya......

If You Are Not Sure If I Am Joking or Not....I AM !!Photos:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/knifemaker1954/sets/
Knifemaker is offline  
post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-22-2011, 03:02 PM
Members who have donated towards server costs
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Posts: 2,850
iTrader: (0)
 
After being through two sets of stock oem ACCTs in 25,000 miles, I can't recommend anything but the TOC manual tensioners. They just plain work, and have been working for 45,000 miles. The spring on the ACCTs really has very little to do with how they are supposed to work. It puts a small amount of tension on the plunger, so it can advance when the chain wears. But it in no way is designed to hold tension on the plunger so it can't back out, the idea behind the use of stronger springs. The plunger must be mechanically locked, so it CANNOT back out no matter what in order for the tensioners to work. When the tensioner is new, the threads are tight enough to do this. But those tensioner internals vibrate like crazy while the engine is running, and the threads quickly wear and become loose. That is when the plunger starts to back out. You can reset it using the "Grambo trick" but it won't stay reset for long, till it backs out again. You can even advance the plunger manually by turning the screw counterclockwise, and stop the noise temporarily, but just like with the Grambo trick, the plunger will back out after a couple hundred miles. The oem ACCTs are a defective design, though they should last a lot longer if made of metal that didn't wear so easily. No matter what you do to them, you will continue to have problems, and all the time the cam chain is making noise, it is sustaining excessive wear. Use of manual tensioners will permanently stop the noise and excessive wear. In the 45,000 miles I have had them, I have not had to adjust them once, after two initial adjustments, getting a feel for just how tight they should be without putting excessive force on the cam chain guide. The noise has never returned. Just my opinion, but I feel this is the best investment you can make for a Vulcan 750. It permanently solves one of the Vulcan's 2 biggest problems, the other being the spline issue, but if yours are good, keep them lubed with moly paste, and they will stay good.

Even BMW messed up on the driveshaft design, and their splines will wear just as fast as the Vulcan's if not constantly maintained. But at least they lubricated theirs at the factory. Ideally a driveshaft should not require any maintenance, other than changing the gear oil. The splines should be lubricated by gear and engine oil, just like they are on a car driveshaft. But then I think motorcycles should have controlled output alternators as well, just like cars, rather than constant output stators, which run wide open at full output all the time, and any excess current must be disposed of by shorting it to ground. I'm fairly certain this design has resulted in the demise of a lot of stators and R/Rs. And while I' on a rant, I also think all street motorcycles should be REQUIRED to have tubeless tires, in order to meet DOT safety requirements. If DOT is going to exist, they should do their job. It was DOT after all that mandated all motorcycles use their headlights 24 hours a day, which actually seemed to work until cars started doing it too, then they just blended into the sea of lights. But to me, the idea of a "modern" motorcycle, with EFI and ABS, still using tube type tires is absolutely ridiculous.

I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker.


1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike
VN750Rider/Jerry is offline  
 
post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-22-2011, 07:56 PM
Chucklehead
 
dragon159's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Poynette WI
Posts: 1,050
iTrader: (3)
 
I lubed my ACCT's almost the same way 2 years ago and haven't had to touch them since. Maybe if I have to got back into them I'll change, but for now if it ain't broke don't fix it.

87 vn750at least that is what the frame #'s say
"Squirrel Bike" aka Jersey

Rat bike with a good PR agent

shaved and coastered
2 into 1 exhaust
rear 170 and front 110
Relocated R/R
custom dash with voltmeter
Spitfire windscreen
Plutonium plugs
Recovered seat without "butt hammers"
More to come
Praise to the Parts Goddess Crobins for needed things

When someone tells me "Great minds think alike" all I can think is "You Pervert"
dragon159 is offline  
post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-23-2011, 03:22 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 59
iTrader: (0)
 
Thanks KM. Was a long day.

Today I replaced the plugs with the NGKs I picked up over a week ago and tried out the yard stick manometer I pieced together per popular threads and found about 8 inches of oil imbalance. After adjusting to level it still didn't run all that well around the block. I noticed that when I rev and let go the FWD vacuum pulls harder for about 20 seconds or so. Is this an indication of a poor A/F mixture?
TimV65 is offline  
post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-23-2011, 03:36 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 59
iTrader: (0)
 
Jerry, I almost went to the MCCT system, but wanted to try the new springs first. I'm working on a theory that lubrication may work and maybe even extend chain and cam life.
Over 40k miles does sound good though. I hope to see at least that.
TimV65 is offline  
post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-23-2011, 09:54 AM
Old Truck Junkie
 
niterider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Roby Texas
Posts: 4,130
iTrader: (15)
 
Sorry Jerry, but we the people don't need the dot (gov) telling us what type of tire system to use.

02 honda sabre 1100
niterider is offline  
post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-25-2011, 12:20 PM
Members who have donated towards server costs
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Posts: 2,850
iTrader: (0)
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by niterider View Post
Sorry Jerry, but we the people don't need the dot (gov) telling us what type of tire system to use.
I totally agree. You got that right. We don't need the govt meddling in the car and motorcycle business at all. If it weren't for them, we would probably still have real bikes and real cars, with no FI, no emissions crap, no ABS, no airbags, and on and on. Bikes and cars are my hobby, and they have destroyed it. Fortunately I have old vehicles that were made before they stuck their nose where it didn't belong, and I personally feel that they can take their interference and shove it up their tail pipe. I would gladly accept tubeless tires if we could get rid of all that other crap too. Tubeless tires are 1940s technology, and I can't understand why manufacturers are still using it. For a while there I thought it was going away, as most bikes had cast wheels. But now they are back in a big way. Except that now they have done away with centerstands too, so what are you supposed to do when you have a flat tire. Unlike all that electronic BS, tubeless tires, just like disc brakes, are technology that has no downside.


I would like to apologize for even suggesting DOT do anything. In fact, both DOT and the EPA need to just plain go away, and let WE THE PEOPLE decide for ourselves what we want. Just think, if vehicles went back to '60s/'70s technology, which worked fine (and included such things as tubeless tires and disc brakes) we could still work on our own vehicles, modify them, whatever. And I'll bet they would be a lot cheaper as well.

I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker.


1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike
VN750Rider/Jerry is offline  
post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-25-2011, 12:27 PM
Old Truck Junkie
 
niterider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Roby Texas
Posts: 4,130
iTrader: (15)
 
I am glad that you agree with me. For a bit there I was worried about you.

I am sure that I have seen spoke wheels that take tubeless tires. But I can't member if they were for car or bikes. If not I am sure they can come up with them. They may cost a bit more.

02 honda sabre 1100
niterider is offline  
post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-25-2011, 12:45 PM
Members who have donated towards server costs
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Posts: 2,850
iTrader: (0)
 
They are available for both cars and bikes. Honda made the first ones I remember back in '86, for use on the '86 and '87 Rebel 450, then never used them again. All BMW R series bikes with wire spoke wheels use tubeless tires, but their cheaper single cylinder chain drive models (which aren't really BMWs at all) don't. The Japanese market version of the XT250, which is also sold in Europe and Australia uses a tubeless wire spoke rim on the rear only. These rims do not cost any more to make than standard spoked rims. There is nothing complicated about them, the spokes just don't go through the rim inside the tire. BMW attaches the spokes to the very outer edge of the rim, Honda and Yamaha used a reverse system, with a flange built into the center of the rim, so the spokes didn't go through the rim at all.

I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker.


1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike
VN750Rider/Jerry is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Bookmarks

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

Once registered, your User Name"cannot be changed". We can make exceptions within 7 days, but after that, it is set in stone.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome