Reinstalling carbs - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-05-2011, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
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Reinstalling carbs

Reinstalling the carbs is proving to be at least as hard as pulling them out. When I removed them I giggled them a bunch but did not really do any additional disassembly.

1) Does it make it easier if I remove the cooling housing so I can raise the air box more?
2) The book makes reference to removing the intake boots from the airbox. I've been just pushing them around because I'm afraid they'll be impossible to push back into the box once the carbs are in. Do you remove the intake tubes?
3) Would someone mind explaining in detail the angles you used during reinstall? Do you have it rotated 45 clockwise when viewed from on top? Do you also pitch them up or down?
4) Do you recommend following the intake book recommendations in the book to keep the front one on the cylinder and the rear on the carb? I find I"m having a lot of trouble getting the carb past the front intake boot.

Perhaps this is all easier with the thermostat housing removed and the airbox raised more????

-Robert
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-05-2011, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertGary1 View Post
Reinstalling the carbs is proving to be at least as hard as pulling them out. When I removed them I giggled them a bunch but did not really do any additional disassembly.

1) Does it make it easier if I remove the cooling housing so I can raise the air box more?
2) The book makes reference to removing the intake boots from the airbox. I've been just pushing them around because I'm afraid they'll be impossible to push back into the box once the carbs are in. Do you remove the intake tubes?
3) Would someone mind explaining in detail the angles you used during reinstall? Do you have it rotated 45 clockwise when viewed from on top? Do you also pitch them up or down?
4) Do you recommend following the intake book recommendations in the book to keep the front one on the cylinder and the rear on the carb? I find I"m having a lot of trouble getting the carb past the front intake boot.

Perhaps this is all easier with the thermostat housing removed and the airbox raised more????

-Robert
Robert,
See my link below...Even though it focuses on the earshave, I believe it will help you.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 02:56 AM
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I've had the carbs in and out a couple times. I found it easiest to drain the coolant and disconnect that upper cooling hose (per the manual) to gain some extra wiggle room. I also took the air duct boots and cylinder head boots all the way off before removing the carbs and wiggled them back into place after the carbs were back in position on the bike.

The ducts aren't too hard to get back in, especially if you put a thin coat of dielectric grease on them.

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 05:42 PM
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Getting the carbs back in is definitely harder than taking them out. I removed the thermostat housing, cooling lines, and air inlets. You can get the air ducts back in ok after the carbs are in place, just don't puncture them with your screwdriver.

One thing that helped me was to put the front boot on the carb and then transfer it to the cylinder when the carbs are almost in place. Just worked out easier for me that way.

I also used WD-40 on all the rubber to aid reassembly.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2011, 04:50 PM
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I also used WD-40 on all the rubber to aid reassembly.
Not a good idea, as WD-40 and 5-56 will over time damage the rubber (dry and crack). Whenever dealing with rubber, always use mineral oil (available at any chain Pharm for a buck 50)...thats what we always used on Harleys and heavy equipment.



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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2011, 07:24 PM
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From WD-40's FAQ section: What surfaces or materials are OK to use WD-40 on?
WD-40 can be used on just about everything. It is safe for metal, rubber, wood and plastic. WD-40 can be applied to painted metal surfaces without harming the paint. Polycarbonate and clear polystyrene plastic are among the few surfaces on which to avoid using a petroleum-based product like WD-40.

And here's a little independent home test: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/arc.../t-619424.html

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-09-2011, 10:01 PM
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To me the problem is not the oil or greases effect on the rubber , it's the fact you lubed something you want to clamp. The oil does not evaporate , so the seal will always be "loose".

We always used isopropyl alcohol to "wet" rubber boots to make them slide on easier. After a short time it evaporates and let's the rubber seal against the metal or plastic fitting.... The way rubber was initially designed to.

For things that needed help sealing... Like rubber grips, we used hairspray or clear laquer. While wet... It's slippery, when it dries, it's sticky.

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-10-2011, 01:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertGary1 View Post
Reinstalling the carbs is proving to be at least as hard as pulling them out. When I removed them I giggled them a bunch but did not really do any additional disassembly.

1) Does it make it easier if I remove the cooling housing so I can raise the air box more?

I don't think you need to do this. I just use a big square screwdriver and use it as a lever to push the air box up. I don't really care if I damage the air box though and don't care about scratching the paint on the frame either. So I dunno if you would use the same method.

2) The book makes reference to removing the intake boots from the airbox. I've been just pushing them around because I'm afraid they'll be impossible to push back into the box once the carbs are in. Do you remove the intake tubes?

When I take off the carbs I leave the intake boots on the cylinders.

3) Would someone mind explaining in detail the angles you used during reinstall? Do you have it rotated 45 clockwise when viewed from on top? Do you also pitch them up or down?

I start by putting them in through the left side of the motorcycle, with the bottom of the carbs pointing towards the right side and down... I suppose at about a 45 degree angle... what I aim is for the slimmer part between the carbs to go through the space between the boots.

After that, I have to jack up the air box so I can straighten the carbs and use some force to get them halfway over the intake boots. Then, I carefully use a non sharp flat head screwdriver on the edges of the intake boots and push the carbs so that they will slide past those boot edges and fall into place.


4) Do you recommend following the intake book recommendations in the book to keep the front one on the cylinder and the rear on the carb? I find I"m having a lot of trouble getting the carb past the front intake boot.

I have no idea, I never read that lol

Perhaps this is all easier with the thermostat housing removed and the airbox raised more????

Definitely need to raise the airbox, but I see no need of removing the thermostat housing unless you think you will use the screwdriver lever method and you might slip and hit the thermostat. It's never happened to me so far though.


-Robert
It was definitely really hard to do the first time I tried all of this, but recently I had to take out the carbs some 5 or 6 times in a row lol so I got pretty good at it. Practice makes perfect.

I'm also the creator of the "kick method" but that's for when you just don't care anymore hahaha. I was so fed up with the carbs I just kicked them into place. Hey, it worked and nothing broke! lol

I did almost break part of the carbs doing something very stupid, but that was a whole different thing lol

These carbs will definitely make you cuss your heart out at times haha
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-12-2011, 02:30 PM Thread Starter
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Ok, I got the carbs in. Not sure if they run yet though. So my history is...

First time removing : 1.5 hours
First time installing : 2.5 hours
(then realized one intake boot was 180 degrees off)
Second time removing: 5 min
Second time installing: 15 min (this is after removing the thermostat housing)

I think having the intake book 180 off the first time actually made it much harder because I couldn't get the long side to slide into position.

-Robert
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-12-2011, 02:50 PM
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Lately...

Lately Ive begun to use Ceal's method...but I use a large rubber mallet which is about 60 yrs old....lil more control that way..."wink"...



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