Possibly buying 750 on Sunday...worried about one thing! - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
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post #1 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 02:17 PM Thread Starter
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Possibly buying 750 on Sunday...worried about one thing!

First post -- glad to be here. Looks like I'm picking up a 750 on Sunday, but...

I'm debating between a '01 Vulcan 750 and a '05 Vulcan 800 Classic. No 900's in my area for sale at my budget right now. But that's okay...I've really become enamored with the idea of the 750. After not riding for some fifteen years, and Iím leaning toward the 750 Vulcan. I grew up on Ď80s Magnas and Viragos, so the vintage style of the 750 really appeals to me, more so than the retro low-and-long Harley-like style thatís all the rage now and is part and parcel of the 800, 900, etc., and most other brands' cruiser models.

Glad to take comments about the comparison, but....getting away from model comparison (shaft vs. chain, standard vs. fuel-injection, etc.) for a moment...

After doing countless hours of research about the three models, a question:

The voltage regulator that is infamous for overheating in the 750 -- to the point where some owners on this forum recommend moving it from its place by the battery to somewhere else on the bike -- has me spooked. I'm not mechanically inclined or experienced in the least, and realistically that's not going to change. I first found mention of it @ this site, and there seems to be a lot of comments about it.

It's low mileage (2001 w/ 3700 miles), so I'm not too worried about the shaft splines...I'll have it checked at its next tune-up/fluid change.

But the voltage regulator problem... I know one has to take what they read on the Net with a grain of salt since problems are always more reported than non-problems, so...is it really that big of a concern, or is the problem truly more the exception than the rule? If one uses the bike for around-the-town hopping, short (2 - 4 hour) weekend trips from time to time...is that the type of useage that will exacerbate (or lessen?) the concern? The one I'm looking at is set-up for a battery trickle charger, if that makes any difference, and the battery has been upgraded to a maintenance-free battery.

The time between now and Sunday is ticking, so would love whatever thoughts folks might want to offer...thanks.
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post #2 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 02:23 PM
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I wouldn't worry about it till it goes out really. If/when that part breaks then mount in the suggested spot as it saves time. But I know for a fact not all vulcaneers are on this site so there are tons of them with the regulator right were they are and have no issues. Go out get the bike and enjoy the ride!

1992 Vulcan 750.
Ear shaved and re-jetted.
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post #3 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 02:40 PM
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I relocated mine, based on what I read here, shortly after I got it. See signature for age of bike, and number of miles before and after relocation. Sending you a PM about the bracket.

I'm keepin' all the left over parts. I'm gonna use 'em to build another bike!
_____________________________________________
"Black Beauty"
1989 VN750 acquired December, 2008, 6,711 miles
Currently 23,298 miles

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2001 Honda CMX250 Rebel acquired July, 2008

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post #4 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 02:56 PM
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I relocated my regulator after it went bad. I'm by no means mechanically inclined. Relocating the regulator was really really easy.


VROC Number: 31246
2003 Kawasaki VN750 SOLD
2006 Honda VTX1800C
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post #5 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 02:57 PM
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Mine is a 92 and still the original (21,000 miles) SO it would seem age doesnt make it fail, and miles maybe not either. From my understanding (new here too, but read here constantly to catch up) its the HEAT that cuases the problem. So depending in your location, hot or cold, your driving habits, as in lots of stop and go intown. its an electronic part, my take on it, Bikes vibrate alot, and you add heat into the mix, its basicly a torture test for the regulator. Its not horribly expensive (not cheap though) and like suggested, move it if you replace it later.

If that is your only "real" concern i say go for it! I love my vulcan and can say other things concern me alot more then that part The dampners, the rectifier. Changeing the voltage regulator shouldnt be to much even for the non mechanical of us, basicly unhook battery (very important when working with electronics) and just match up what you unhook to the new one.

Its a bike, its not a car so its going to take some preventive maintance, and you really should watch it closer then a car (or what most people watch a car like). Dont let it worry ya, you may just go the next 20,000 without anything but oil changes and regualr upkeep.
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post #6 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 03:48 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clok1966 View Post
other things concern me alot more then that part The dampners, the rectifier.
I'll be honest -- I'm not even sure I have the technical terminology straight. Most posts mentioned the voltage regulator (overheating and then moving it), but I believe others combined the voltage regulator with the rectifier. I don't even have a clue what a rectifier is. Should that be moved, too? Hope it's not something else I need to get paranoid over...
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post #7 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 03:56 PM
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If you read my procedure, you'll see it's not a huge deal to do, and you don't really have to be technical to do it. I eventually removed my pre-muffler (goats belly) which is the oven that helps cook the regulator, so maybe it's a moot point if you decide to put Vance and Hines Cruisers on it.

I caution you about letting someone else check your splines though! This is one thing you need to see for yourself, whether you do it yourself, or have someone help you. Most dealerships have no idea what you are talking about. Read my recent thread about this. During the time I wrote that thread, someone else blew out their splines because they weren't lubed!

There's lots of information here about everything VN750, but one of the most important things you need to do, especially on that year model is lube those splines. See the procedures below in my sig! Good luck to you!

Fergy
Kyle, TX VN750.com member #707 VROC#19556
2002 VN1500 Classic
Spline Lube Procedure, with photos, R/R Relocation and Coil Mod
Rusty Tank Cleaning!
Electrical Fault Finding Flowchart
SEAFOAM JUNKIE!


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post #8 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 04:01 PM
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rectifier is inside the engine, depending on your knowledge, its the same as a cars alternator (sorta). here is the very simple (and maybe even wrong) explination. The rectifier makes the new electricity for your bike, recharges the battery after its started the bike, keeps the lights going and powers the spark plugs.. the voltage Regulator makes sure nothing gets to much power. the faster you go the more power is made, the regulator changes it to a steady useable power.

Think of it like your garden hose. with no end on the hose with it turned on full the water all just runs out as fast as the hose will allo,. then put a nozzle on it, you can make the water come out just how you want.. slower, faster. The rectifire makes the water, the regulator changes how much.

the rectifier isnt to bad hard to change if it fails, the problem is the bike engine needs to be tipped, so you need to basicly act like your taking the engine out, you have alot of bolts to losen or remove. Basilcy more work then the Voltage regulator. but you said it yourself, these are parts that have failed enough people have fixed, asked lots of questions about um.. but Nobody asks questions about parts that work. While these parts have failed, it sure doesnt mean they will for you.

With all that said, here is one way to look at it. NO BIKE doesnt have its quirks, you wont find any that wont require some strange process for something. Unless you buy somthing with a warrenty, they all have somthing just like the volatage regulaor on the Vulcan, its just something else.

Again, be aware, but dont let this stuff stop you, a different bike will have parts that are known to be "check um before you buy" also.

As I said 21,000 on mine and nothing but normal mantinace.. tires, brake pads, oil changes. And when checked over by a bike mechanic I was told its in great shape.. Yours is 9 years newer.. you probebly wont have a problem with anything for ages....

When i was looking for a bike I used a Motorcycle buyers guide webpage (sorry cant remeber address here at work) which had user reviews and proessional reviews. the Vulcan was said to be a VERY solid long lasting bike. And i read the same everywhere i could find.

Last edited by clok1966; 04-22-2010 at 04:05 PM.
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post #9 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 04:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clok1966 View Post
rectifier is inside the engine, depending on your knowledge, its the same as a cars alternator (sorta). here is the very simple (and maybe even wrong) explination. The rectifier makes the new electricity for your bike, recharges the battery after its started the bike, keeps the lights going and powers the spark plugs.. the voltage Regulator makes sure nothing gets to much power. the faster you go the more power is made, the regulator changes it to a steady useable power.

Think of it like your garden hose. with no end on the hose with it turned on full the water all just runs out as fast as the hose will allo,. then put a nozzle on it, you can make the water come out just how you want.. slower, faster. The rectifire makes the water, the regulator changes how much.

the rectifier isnt to bad hard to change if it fails, the problem is the bike engine needs to be tipped, so you need to basicly act like your taking the engine out, you have alot of bolts to losen or remove. Basilcy more work then the Voltage regulator. but you said it yourself, these are parts that have failed enough people have fixed, asked lots of questions about um.. but Nobody asks questions about parts that work. While these parts have failed, it sure doesnt mean they will for you.

With all that said, here is one way to look at it. NO BIKE doesnt have its quirks, you wont find any that wont require some strange process for something. Unless you buy somthing with a warrenty, they all have somthing just like the volatage regulaor on the Vulcan, its just something else.

Again, be aware, but dont let this stuff stop you, a different bike will have parts that are known to be "check um before you buy" also.

As I said 21,000 on mine and nothing but normal mantinace.. tires, brake pads, oil changes. And when checked over by a bike mechanic I was told its in great shape.. Yours is 9 years newer.. you probebly wont have a problem with anything for ages....

When i was looking for a bike I used a Motorcycle buyers guide webpage (sorry cant remeber address here at work) which had user reviews and proessional reviews. the Vulcan was said to be a VERY solid long lasting bike. And i read the same everywhere i could find.
Sorry clok, the regulator and rectifier (rr, or r/r, or RR etc.) are all in one unit under the battery box. The stator (alternator) is located inside the engine cover on the left side, and generates ac current which is "rectified" into dc current which runs the bike.

Gordon

1991 VN 750 -"Cosmic Lady" or "Bad Girl"?
Purchased May 16, 2008
Approx.19,300km (12,000 miles)

H-D windshield
Relocated R/R
MF-AGM battery
Fiamm Freeway Blaster horns
F&S luggage rack and engine guard
Kury Offset Hiway pegs
July 13, 2016, Riding on the DARKSIDE now, Classic Radial 165/80-15


TOP TEN THINGS A NEW RIDER/OWNER SHOULD DO. Click on link.
https://www.vn750.com/forum/11-vn750-general-discussion/9127-top-ten-items-you-would-suggest-new-owner-do-his-new-ride.html

Last edited by OlHossCanada; 04-22-2010 at 04:22 PM.
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post #10 of 36 (permalink) Old 04-22-2010, 04:42 PM
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"Sorry clok, the regulator and rectifier (rr, or r/r, or RR etc.) are all in one unit under the battery box."


There you go. The R/R is a regulator and rectifier , hence the name used here, R/R.. (is that a pirate or Robin Williams?)

And for at-home-daddy....

I ran my bike for almost five years and never moved the R/R. The new owner of the bike still has it in the stock place too.

Contrray to what ANYONE says here, there is no proof what-so-ever that moving the R/R will keep it from failing, or that not moving it will cause it to fail.

It is just one of those things that seems to make sence, but is supported by zero facts....just benchwarmers theory.

Truely if you want to worry about something, worry about the stator going out, as this requires the engine to be "moved" (either by removing it completely or tilting it in the frame...) Something that most rather not deal with even if somewhat mechinically inclined.

I'm not going to tell you which bike to get here, The 800 has it's faults too, But I also did not ride for awhile and the Vulcan 750 was my pick to "get back in the game" and for many of the reasons you outlined. I did after those 5 years long for someting more, and got a bigger and faster bike.........but durring that time the bike was, in my mind , the perfect pick.

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