New Guy with questions before a purchase - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-13-2020, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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New Guy with questions before a purchase

I have an opportunity to pick up a 2000 model today. It has been sitting a year due to issues with the starter. I'm sure it will need a carb kits etc. Are there major concerns with the carbs as far as getting parts and such that should make me steer clear?

I currently ride an ST1300, and I have done lots of wrenching on it over the years. I am not a carb guy however.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-13-2020, 10:57 AM
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Shouldn't be a problem.
Those parts are available.
Instructions for working on carbs is available on this forum.

This is one source for OEM parts and there are other sources:

https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/ka...rburetor-parts

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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-13-2020, 11:01 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the response.

Any specific issues with a 2000 that I would need to watch for? This is a completely new style for me. I rode an 04 Dl650 until Hurricane Michael got it and the garage. St1300 that I love since.

This bike seems like a perfect beach day cruiser if I am not getting into problems. I work on bikes on a teachers budget LOL>
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-14-2020, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Phinhead View Post
Thank you for the response.

Any specific issues with a 2000 that I would need to watch for? This is a completely new style for me. I rode an 04 Dl650 until Hurricane Michael got it and the garage. St1300 that I love since.

This bike seems like a perfect beach day cruiser if I am not getting into problems. I work on bikes on a teachers budget LOL>
Every model of everything has some kind of issue. These have stator issues, hot start issues and other things. There are plenty of mods and resources on here that will cure whatever ailments you might encounter. At the end of the day, your new toy will be "yours" and fun.

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-15-2020, 12:11 AM
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I don't want top rain on your parade, but these bikes tend to have more problems. I'm on my third one, first two were bought new. I like them so much that I put up with their problems. The stator is the big issue with these bikes. It can fail at any time or never. It requires pulling the engine to replace. I have never had problems with the carbs (I am only a carb ONLY guy, I don't mess with computer bikes) but if they were left with gas sitting in them for a long time (not a good idea on any motorcycle) they may be plugged up. And they are a real PITA to remove and replace. So much so that many owners permanently remove the entire intake system to make them easier to get to. I am/was a professional auto mechanic, and choose to keep mine stock, but they are difficult to remove and replace even for me. Ethanol gas can damage carb and petcock parts. The stock cam chain tensioners are prone to failure at low mileage. And when they fail they pretty much destroy the engine. Aftermarket manual tensioners are available. The other BIG issue with these bikes is the final drive splines. It seems many of them were never lubricated at the factory, and many owners never lubricated them during maintenance. They get chewed up quick if not kept properly lubed. And good used final drive assemblies are getting hard to find.

I bought my third Vulcan used, with 27,000 miles on it. My second one, bought new, failed at 108,000 miles when the top rear cam chain broke (these bikes have FOUR cam chains) There was a lot of engine damage, but since I bought it new, everything else had been maintained properly, and was in good condition. I would not have bought the used bike if I hadn't had the other one as a parts bike. Both new and used parts are becoming harder and harder to find, and are getting more expensive.

And yes, these bikes do tend to have starting problems. They need a good battery and good spark plugs or they sometimes won't start at all. They have four spark plugs. In fact they seem to have four of everything. 4 cams, 4 cam chains, 4 valves per cylinder, and 4 spark plugs.

If all this doesn't deter you, go for it. But if I didn't have a good parts bike, I would have probably bought a Honda Shadow 1100 Spirit or Sabre (the older carb models)
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1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-15-2020, 02:33 AM
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Before you just go and remove the carbs, try a low cost move that might fix you up. There was a three year period where I didn't ride at all (Extended family woes, mostly.) The only time I literally touched it was to move it around the garage every now and then.

When I did get back to it, I just ran a lot of SeaFoam through the tank and most of whatever was gummed up was fixed. I did wind up having to remove and soak the main jets but those can be reached while the carbs are still on the bike. I had to pull the mains because until you run the bike past 4K rpm the SeaFoam won't get into the main jets. It'll clean the pilot jets though and you can run around just fine as long as you keep it under 4K rpm.

Before just jumping into the PITA act of pulling the carbs, (and Jerry is right, they ARE a pain in the koondingy to pull) you can't hurt anything by trying the SeaFoam thing first. If the SeaFoam doesn't do the trick, then pulling the carbs might be required. I only offer the suggestion since while dis-assembling and cleaning the carbs is the absolute best way to clean them, its not the only way to clean them. And SeaFoam is sure as hell far less labor intensive.

Get a good AGM type battery. These things will go through a wet cell battery like nobody's business. Some iridium plugs will optimize your spark. Get NGK DPR7EIX-9 plugs.

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-16-2020, 05:33 AM
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I have also done the Seafoam in the carbs thing, but only as maintenance or for storage. I drain the carbs, tighten the drain screws, and pour full strength Seafoam in through the CARB VENT HOSE. This will get a little more in the carbs than pouring it in through the fuel lines, and you don't have to remove the fuel lines from the petcock. Pour it in very slowly (I use the cut off top of a qt. gear oil bottle with the little nozzle cap on it, stick the nozzle in the hose, and pour slowly till it starts coming out the overflow vents on the bottom of the carbs. It will come out there before any runs into the cylinders. You can turn the engine over with the starter, which will suck it into the idle jet, but not the main jet. However, with the carbs full of Seafoam, both jets are completely submerged. Another issue with the carbs that you can't get to without removing them is plugged up emulsion tubes. These tubes have a lot of tiny holes in the sides, and they plug up easy. The holes are for air, not gas.

If you do pull the carbs, and have worked on carbs before, be aware that these are different. They are basically two carbs in one piece. The float chambers are separate from the rest of the carbs. The biggest issue I had was getting the enrichening circuit linkage back together. It can be done. You just have to be patient. The carbs can be removed, disassembled, cleaned, and reinstalled. But there are a couple of tricks that make it a lot easier that the service manual does not tell you. I figured it out just by carefully looking things over.

I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker.


1997 Vulcan 750, purchased about a week ago
2006 Sportster 1200 Low
2013 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, converted to carb
2001 Yamaha XT225, heavily modified
2004 Honda Rebel 250
1979 Vespa P200E
2002 Vulcan 750 parts bike
1994 Yamaha XT225 parts bike
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-06-2020, 01:39 AM
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A lot of good info here, thank you.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-06-2020, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phinhead View Post
Thank you for the response.

Any specific issues with a 2000 that I would need to watch for?
Doesn’t Matter what year. All the same meatball. 85-05


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