Spark Plugs / Wires [Archive] - Kawasaki Vulcan 750 Forum : Kawasaki VN750 Forums

: Spark Plugs / Wires


Vulcan Verses
01-19-2006, 09:02 PM
Spark plug type ..
Standard heat range ....U.S., Canadian, Australia, Italy So. Africa..NGK DP7EA-9, ND X22EP-U9 (All other)..NGK DPR7EA-9, ND X22EPR-U9 ..
Optional heat range ....U.S., Canadian, Australia, Italy So. Africa..NGK DP8EA-9, ND X24EP-U9 (All other)..NGK DPR8EA-9, ND X24EPR-U9
Spark plug gap 0.8-0.9 mm (0.03- 0.04 in.)


Which NGK Plug? My book says DP7EA-9 or DP8EA-9 for US models.

The resistor spark plugs won't make a difference. You need to gap them correctly though.

Check for spark: Gap your plugs! Remove a plug and put the wire back on. Hold the end of the plug to ground with something insulated, crank the engine and see if you have spark at the plug. Do this to all the plugs.

I should correct myself a little here. You could have wet plugs which would mean you are getting fuel to the cylinders but wet plugs could also tell you you are getting too much fuel to the cylinders also. This could cause your plugs to foul out and prevent you from getting spark. So if you have wet plugs clean them off and do the "spark plug test" to make sure the problem isn't electrical. Then once you know you have good spark you can eliminate that part of the problem and see that it's now a fuel problem. If you don't have spark and the plugs are wet you know that the fuel system is working and your problem now is electrical. Sorry I didn't make it more clear before.

NGK's are the way to go. NGK DP7EA-9 Thats what the book calls for. Gap is .8~.9mm or .032in~.036in I worked for Nissan for 10 years and stand behind the NGK plugs.

I recently installed champion plugs on my bike and it ran like crap. After only 20 miles on the Champion plugs, I replaced them with NGK plugs and the difference is amazing. DC

Iridium plugs

The advantage is (they claim) "Longer life, lower fuel consumption,smoother running,Improved ignition efficaintcy-giving enhanced power and acceleration" The part that matters really is the "improved ignition efficaincy" as iridium can "spark hotter" at a lower voltage. Given our feeble electrical system, anything that uses less power is good. The part number is 7803 at Advanced Auto. The plug is the DPR7IX9. KM

Worn plugs cause hard starting My spark plugs had about 13,000 miles on them and I was beginning to experience multiple tries to get the engine started, hot or cold. Figured it was time for new plugs. On Mike O's recommendation I installed new iridium spark plugs, gapped to .035'', anti sieze on the threads and torqued to 144 inch lbs (12 ft pounds). Now starts first time every time, hot or cold. Barely have to touch the start button. Thanks Mike, they really work. NGK DPR7EIX-9. About $10.00 each, but I think they will be worth it. The bike will probably fall apart before I have to change them again. Dennis in Maryland

I had the same experience with these last year, Dennis. Now I just have to barely breathe on the start button and she starts right up. I fugured they're well worth the slight extra cost. A lot of us spend way more than that on cosmetic upgrades and shiny chrome bits. I bought mine at Shade Tree for abt $8 ea. They should last longer, and I since I also keep detailed track of my gas mileage all the time, I also noticed an average increase of about 2 MPG after installing them See if you notice the same thing.... -Tim S.

I do think engines run better on them as they require so much less voltage to produce a better spark.

I priced Iridium NGK at all my mail order suppliers and finally bought them from Chaparral at $7 each last year.

OK, you guys talked me into it. I found them at Motorcycle Pro Shop for $7.31 plus shipping & handling. Might be a pretty good price if anyone else wants some.... http://tinyurl.com/b4pmu Product ID: DPR7EIX-9 Product Name: NGK IRIDIUM SPARK PLUG Product Price: $7.31 Quantity: 4 SubTotal: $29.24 Shipping: $7.00(Regular Shipping) Handling: $2.00 State Tax: $0.00 Country Tax: $0.00 Grand Total: $38.24

Also try Sparkplugs.com

Just thought I'd mentioned this as it might save someone a few bucks. There was a discussion on the group a little while go about these plugs (DPR7EIX-9) and where to get them. The internet lowest price was around 7 bucks plus shipping. I decided to get some before the Gathering and thought I'd try locally to save the shipping. I looked on the net at the chains here locally (Autozone, O'Reilly's, and Advance Auto) and they were all around 10.xx or so. In talking to Dan Tadrick of the group he mentioned he had them and the part number is 7803. Well, if you search for DPR7EIX-9 at the Advance Auto site is comes back at 10.99. However if you put in just 7803, you get several things with the same part number, but one of them is the NGK plug for only 6.96. What's up with that? Anyway, I went to the local Advance store and it is the same plug. So if you happen to have an Advance store nearby (mostly east and some in the midwest), the price is as low as the internet without the shipping. (And yes I'm an accountant so maybe Freak is right about the beancounter part :-). John STL,MO

_____

If you have a Sears Hardware store nearby, socket# 943330, 18mm, 6pt, 3/8" drive works great for all plug locations. If not, try Sears.com.

Vulcan Verses
01-19-2006, 09:02 PM
Spark Plug Wires and Ends For the VN700/750:

You should consider buying NGK plug ends if you haven't already. They are great looking and my directions are based on using them.
Dennis Kirk: or 1-800-328-9280

2 Part# 20306 - XD05F Spark Plug Cap $3.30 a piece.
2 Part# 20789 - NGK Spark Plug Cap/LD05FP $4.80 a piece.

Grab yourself a roll of 8 mm non-resistor type wire from your local auto parts store or speed shop. They may have to special order it. Even a 50 foot roll costs less than the Kawasaki replacement option. I chose bright yellow... Looks good on my black and red bike IMHO.

Here are the wire lengths you will need:

2 x 11.5" long 1 x 14.5" long
1 x 20.0" long

Measure your old wires to make sure it'll work. If you can get 60", you should have some to spare.

I cut my wire with a sharp scissors and stripped off the yellow insulation so that the wire slipped into the coil easily. If you can get it to slip into the coil with the yellow intact, that's even better. Take the rubber "O" looking thing along with it's plastic cap (if intact) and use them on this new wire. I had to squeeze the wire into these "O" shaped holders on the coil end with a very small screwdriver. I pushed the "O" onto the wire as far as I could (about 1/10 of an inch) and then "stuffed" the yellow insulation under the "O" thing. This "O" thing holds the wire in place along with the cap that screws onto the coil. Obviously, put the wire all the way into the coil with about 1/8th inch of room between the "O" thing and the edge of the coil. Then use the screw cap to tighten the wire down and into the coil. The plug ends "screw" onto the wire if you buy the NGK I told you about. Just make sure you have the proper parts at hand and already slid up the wire before you do this or you will have to unscrew the ends and start over. The "short" ends have a tighter rubber seal that is a pain in the tuckus. Be prepared to work that baby on by hand for a bit. Some people use dielectric grease to make it slide better... Joe in Northern, NJ - V#8013-R

"Torque is one of the most critical aspects of spark plug installation. Torque directly affects the spark plugs' ability to transfer heat out of the combustion chamber. A spark plug that is under-torqued will not be fully seated on the cylinder head, hence heat transfer will be slowed. This will tend to elevate combustion chamber temperatures to unsafe levels, and pre-ignition and detonation will usually follow. Serious engine damage is not far behind. An over-torqued spark plug can suffer from severe stress to the Metal Shell which in turn can distort the spark plug's inner gas seals or even cause a hairline fracture to the spark plug's insulator...in either case, heat transfer can again be slowed and the above mentioned conditions can occur."
My manual says 12 ft-lbs for the plugs, in case anyone else needs to know. That's 144 inch/lbs for those that have an inch/lb torque wrench.
FWIW, I happened to have the owner's manual out it shows the torque to be 10 ft-lbs for the plugs.

OK, I checked and you are right. My Kawasaki Factory Service Manual says 12, my owner's manual says 10, and my Clymer manual says 8.5. What's a Vulcanero to do?

Looking back at NGK's site, they post a chart for their different plugs. ( http://tinyurl.com/6t8yp ) and while I can't be certain which particular line applies to us, each plug offers a RANGE of acceptable torque values. Taking a GUESS that we're the 12mm thread diameter with the Aluminum Cylinder head (does this sound right??), it says 10.8~14.5 ft/lb. The ranges are considerably narrower for Aluminum blocks as opposed to cast iron. The point is, there might not be one precise torque value that works. So we aim for the approx. middle of the window. What do you think? -Tim S.

I measured it, it is 12mm thread diameter. RB

Jim, the Clymer says 8.5 for the spark plug retainer, which is not the same as the spark plug (I know, confusing isn't it?) and I do not see a listing for just the spark plugs. The manual, pg 98 says to hand tighten and then 1/2 turn if new or 1/4 turn if reusing plugs. And the Haynes Service & Repair Manual says to torque ot 18Nm So I would go with 12 ft/lbs myself. RB

The spark plug retainers, one per cylinder, are cylindrical inserts which screw into the cam-chain side of each, and hold the spark plug. They each have two o-rings. I tried to upload a snapshot from the manual, but Yahoo is acting like, well, Yahoo.
Yes: Owners manual calls for 10 ft-lb

But: Kaw service manual for my 2001, the exploded diagram on page 15-4, the T2 for the spark plugs shows 12 ft-lb.

And: Clymer manual gives no torque spec, just says 1/2 turn after the gasket seats for new plugs, 1/4 turn for used plugs. Go figure. Dennis in Maryland

offhand, I'd say use the 10ft/lbs..better safe than sorry. The 1/2 or 1/4 turn is a guide for those without torque wrenches..obviously not as exact as using one... KM

Also, depending on if you use the suggested "never seize" your value may vary. I religiously do and go with 12 ft-lbs (144 in-lbs). Installing plug dry and torquing, I'd probably go with a slightly lesser torque (10 ft-lbs ? )

Plug WiresKirk has 7mm wire for $2.99 in a 72" length the part # is 20- 21. Ad two NGK end caps part #20-306 $3.30 and two end caps part#20- 789 $2.40.

I used standard 7mm. Actually Drag Specialties DS-241901, two sets, solid copper. Caps I used were the NGK XD05F, long cover and LD05F, short cover.

Are those resistor caps? The Kaw's have replacable resistors.

You can get the NGK caps from Dennis Kirk or most independant bike shops.

8mm is the way to go. You can't have enough insulation when it comes to your spark current. Years ago my old '71 V8 Jeep would run like crap or not start when it was wet out, same with my friends '74 Nova. We installed 8mm Accel wires and were in heaven. Since then I've always used high performance aftermarket wires (Accel, MSD, Taylor etc) with great success. -Bruce Detroit

You should consider buying NGK plug ends if you haven't already. They are great looking and my directions are based on using them. Dennis Kirk: Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. or 1-800-328-9280

2 Part# 20306 - XD05F Spark Plug Cap $3.30 a piece.

2 Part# 20789 - NGK Spark Plug Cap/LD05FP $4.80 a piece.

Grab yourself a roll of 8 mm non-resistor type wire from your local auto parts store or speed shop. They may have to special order it. Even a 50 foot roll costs less than the Kawasaki replacement option. I chose bright yellow... Looks good on my black and red bike IMHO. Here are the wire lengths you will need: 2 x 11.5" long 1 x 14.5" long 1 x 20.0" long Measure your old wires to make sure it'll work. If you can get 60", you should have some to spare. I cut my wire with a sharp scissors and stripped off the yellow insulation so that the wire slipped into the coil easily. If you can get it to slip into the coil with the yellow intact, that's even better.

Take the rubber "O" looking thing along with it's plastic cap (if intact) and use them on this new wire. I had to squeeze the wire into these "O" shaped holders on the coil end with a very small screwdriver. I pushed the "O" onto the wire as far as I could (about 1/10 of an inch) and then "stuffed" the yellow insulation under the "O" thing. This "O" thing holds the wire in place along with the cap that screws onto the coil. Obviously, put the wire all the way into the coil with about 1/8th inch of room between the "O" thing and the edge of the coil. Then use the screw cap to tighten the wire down and into the coil.

The plug ends "screw" onto the wire if you buy the NGK I told you about. Just make sure you have the proper parts at hand and already slid up the wire before you do this or you will have to unscrew the ends and start over. The "short" ends have a tighter rubber seal that is a pain in the tuckus. Be prepared to work that baby on by hand for a bit. Some people use dielectric grease to make it slide better... Joe in Northern, NJ V#8013 `86 VN750 (For Sale!!!)